When should physicians provide a good death?

By Mark McQuain

A recent New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) Perspective by Deborah Denno, Ph.D., J.D., entitled “Physician Participation in Lethal Injection” (subscription or limited free access required) discussed physician involvement in state-sanctioned capital punishment by lethal injection. Some of the arguments for physician involvement in euthanasia (“a good death”) or Physician-Assisted Suicide (PAS) would seem to apply to some degree to lethal injection and is the subject of this blog entry.

For those without access, the article explored a recent Supreme Court rejection in Bucklew v. Precythe of a Missouri death row inmate’s appeal for protection from lethal injection under the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition of “cruel and unusual punishment”. In short, Russell Bucklew has a rare vascular condition making venous access both difficult and potentially more painful to use lethal injection as the means to execute him. It was argued that his medical condition necessitated at least medical training to guide the injection process, if not actual physician/surgeon training, such as possessed by an anesthesiologist, to provide the actual vein access for the lethal injection. In rejecting his appeal, the Court responded, in part, “the Eighth Amendment does not guarantee a prisoner a painless death – something that isn’t guaranteed to many people, including most victims of capital crimes.” The Court added that methods prohibited are those that “superadd terror, pain or disgrace to their executions”, though as the article points out, the Court does not specify as to how to test those limits, and left unanswered whether physician involvement was legally required to guarantee satisfaction of the Eighth Amendment.

The article discusses the fact that national medical associations generally strongly discourage their members from providing guidance for lethal injection. The American Medical Association’s (AMA’s) own amicus brief for the case listed above states that the AMA opposes capital punishment. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) takes a similar position opposing participation of its members in lethal injection. Both the AMA and the ASA agree that capital punishment is not the practice of medicine and the ASA goes further to challenge the Court to look elsewhere for any lethal injection skills.

Interestingly, both organizations are less precise on their position regarding physician involvement in euthanasia or PAS. The AMA sees PAS as causing “more harm than good”. The ASA has no official published position on PAS that I could find on their website. Their Statement on Palliative Care does not mention euthanasia or PAS. This is important, as there is a growing demand for physician involvement in euthanasia/PAS, the implication being that there is additional benefit with physician involvement in achieving a good death.

For the record, I have always believed that physicians are uniquely the worst choice for killing people under any circumstance as our training universally focuses on honing skills that avoid causing death to our patients. We are effectively trained at not killing and would therefore provide dysthanasia – a bad death. But, perhaps, I am mistaken. There is growing demand to involve physicians in actively and purposefully killing their patients, with many holding the contrary belief that physicians uniquely have the best skill set to provide for euthanasia – a good death.

So, even though Russell Bucklew failed to make a successful legal case for physician involvement in lethal injection, did he make a sufficient moral case? If physicians and their unique skills are necessary for euthanasia/PAS, are they not equally necessary for state-sanctioned execution, particularly given that the latter involves the non-voluntary death of an individual who is guaranteed Eighth Amendment protections, and especially given our inability to provide any scientific evidence that we are satisfying those protections?

If physicians really are the best at providing euthanasia, doesn’t moral justice demand we require a physician to similarly provide a good, physician-assisted, state-sanctioned, death (PASSD) despite the stated objections of the AMA and ASA? Anything less arguably opens the door for adding “terror, pain or disgrace” to the execution.

Parental responsibility in childhood immunizations

Steve Phillips

Last week I wrote about the issue of parental responsibility and medical decision-making for children. We have good reasons for having parents be the primary decision makers for children who are not capable of making their own medical decisions. However, as I discussed in the last post, there are some situations in which parents make decisions that are not in the best interest of their child. When those decisions reach the point at which the child’s life is in danger, society clearly has a moral obligation to intervene to save the life of the child.

Parental refusal of recommended immunizations for their children raises similar issues but is more complex. We can clearly demonstrate that it is in a child’s best interest to receive at least most of the commonly recommended immunizations for children. Those immunizations help to prevent a child being affected by diseases that can be serious and have a very low risk for serious adverse effects. However, the chance of an individual child being affected by many of these diseases is relatively small and the situation is quite different from a child whose life is in immediate danger due to a parental refusal of treatment. Since the risk to an individual child is relatively small and there is some possible risk to the child from receiving the immunization, it is not clear that a parent who refuses immunizations for a child is being negligent in the same way as a parent who refuses treatment for a life-threatening illness. It can be argued that the best way to deal with this type of situation is education. Many times, parents refuse immunizations for their children because of misconceptions about the risks and a lack of understanding of the benefits of doing the immunizations. It can be difficult to counter widespread misconceptions, but physicians have the responsibility of trying to do that the best that we can. However, this is not the only issue involved in determining whether society has an obligation to intervene and mandate childhood immunizations when parents refuse.

Immunizations are unique in the way that they work. They help protect the individual who is immunized, but they also help protect the community as a whole when we can achieve sufficient levels of immunity to halt the spread of an infectious disease within the community. This is sometimes called herd immunity. We have an excellent example of how this works with the current measles outbreak in the United States. Measles happens to be one of the most easily transmittable infectious diseases that we know of. It also can be deadly in a small percentage of the people who acquire the disease. It is also primarily a disease of children and is transmitted by children. When about 97% of children have been immunized in a community the disease will not be transmitted through that community and those who have not been immunized or cannot be immunized are protected from acquiring the disease. This level of immunity was accomplished in the United States about 20 years ago and for some time the only cases of measles that were seen in the United States were cases that originated elsewhere. However, because of parents refusing to have their children immunized for measles in significant numbers in some parts of the country, herd immunity is no longer present and we are having outbreaks of measles this year that are more than we have seen in 20 years.

That raises a different question. Should we mandate immunization of children for diseases such as measles and override parental decision-making not solely for the benefit of the children whose parents refuse to have them immunized but for the common good of the community? There are some children and other individuals who cannot be immunized or for whom immunizations would not be effective who are put at increased risk when herd immunity is not achieved in the community. This makes the decision about whether to immunize a child not just a decision about what is best for that child but also a decision about what is best for the community. For Christian parent it makes the decision about whether to immunize a child a decision about love of neighbor. Immunizing one’s own child helps to protect the child, but it also helps to protect the most vulnerable in the community. If we truly love our neighbor, we should do that even if there is a small risk to our own child. The final question is whether we as a society should require children to be immunized for these diseases when a parent is not willing to authorize it out of either concern for the best interest of the child or concern for those who are vulnerable in the community.

Parental responsibility in medical decisions for children

By Steve Phillips

The 2 posts on this blog this week by Neil Skjoldal and Mark McQuain raise issues related to parental decision-making for the medical treatment of their children. Neil raised this issue related to parental refusal of life-saving treatment for acute leukemia and Mark raised it related to parental decisions not to have their children immunized for measles. There are some similarities in these situations and some differences. An obvious similarity is that in both of these situations parents are making a decision to refuse treatment for their children that is the recommended standard of care. Both situations raise issues about who should make decisions about the medical care that children receive and how those decisions should be made.

One thing we should be clear about is that this is not a conflict between the principle of respect for autonomy and the principle of beneficence. Respect for autonomy says that a person should be able to make decisions about what happens to his or her own body. It says that it shows disrespect to an individual as a person to insist a person receive recommended medical care when that person has the capability of making his or her own decisions and does not consent to the recommended care. This principle does not apply to decisions about the medical care of young children. Young children are not capable of making decisions about their own care and the parents are not the ones receiving medical treatment, so respect for autonomy does not apply to these situations.

What is involved is our understanding of parental responsibility for making medical decisions for their children. Because young children do not have the ability to make their own medical decisions, someone needs to serve as a decision-maker for them. We generally understand that parents ought to be the ones making those decisions. We have good reasons for that. Decisions about the medical care of young children should be made based on what is in the best interest of those children. God has created us as human beings to be dependent during the early part of our lives. He has put us in families with parents who have the responsibility for providing for the needs of their dependent children. Parents should love their children unconditionally as a precious gift and make decisions for their children based on what is best for each child. This usually makes parents the people who care the most about doing what is best for a child and makes them the best medical decision makers for their child.

However, sometimes parents do not fulfill their parental responsibilities as well as they should. None of us are perfect, but there are times when it is clear that the decision being made by a parent is not what is best for a child. When the potential consequences for the child are serious enough it can become the responsibility of the rest of us to intervene for the benefit of the child. We should not violate parental responsibility lightly, and it needs to be done in a controlled and orderly way, but when the child’s life is in danger, we have a responsibility as a society to intervene to protect a child. We should do this in any type of severe neglect or abuse.  We should do it when parents refuse medical treatment for a child who is likely to die if without treatment and the treatment has a good chance of saving the child’s life.

That appears to be the case in the situation in Neil’s post. The concern about parents refusing immunizations for their children has some similarities, but is more complex. It will take another post to address that.

Measles: When does Screening, Quarantining and/or Vaccination become Mandatory?

By Mark McQuain

As this linked PBS NewsHour interview between Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and Judy Woodruff reports, the number of new cases of measles in the US has reached nearly 700, which is the highest number of new cases since measles was supposedly eliminated in 2000. The video is short and provides a quick review of the current causes of the outbreak and suggested steps one can take to mitigate future personal and family risks of contracting the disease. The reason for this being the subject of this bioethics blog is to touch on the ethical tensions between personal autonomy and utilitarian public health calculations regarding the recent measles outbreak.

So what is the problem with getting measles in the first place? Measles is a highly contagious viral respiratory disease. Simply being in the same room with someone with the disease can lead to becoming infected. In its milder form, the disease results in fever, runny nose, ear infection and a classic spotted red skin rash. In its more severe form, it can cause a severe pneumonia requiring hospitalization, deafness, lifelong brain damage and even death. Children under 5 years of age are at particular risk. A common two-stage vaccine called MMR is available that successfully immunizes 97% of those that receive it. It is given at age one and again around age 5.

The benefits of the immunization are two-fold. The first is direct personal protection against contracting the disease if you receive the vaccination and are one of the 97% of individuals who gain future immunity against the measles virus. The second is something called herd immunity. If enough people are immunized (experts estimate “enough” to be between 95-97% of the population), then even people who cannot be immunized, such as infants less than one year of age or individuals whose immune systems are compromised, are still somewhat protected from contracting the disease. This is because new measles cases from “outside the herd” are severely limited in their ability to spread to the small number of non-immunized people within the largely immunized herd. The immunized people effectively act as a physical barrier to protect the non-immunized people. Problem solved, right?

To quote my favorite ESPN College Gameday commentator coach Lee Corso: “Not so fast, my friend”. The measles vaccine is not completely risk-free. Minor side effects include fever, rash and local injection site infections. Much less common but more severe reactions include seizures and rare deaths from severe allergic reactions. In the late 1990s, the British medical journal Lancet published a study by Andrew Wakefield positing a link between the MMR vaccine and autism. This study was later proven to be a completely falsified claim and Wakefield was completely discredited, though some parents still use the original study to argue against vaccinating their children.

If the vaccine were completely risk-free, there would be no logical or ethical reason not to receive the vaccination. If everyone who could take the vaccine did so, herd immunity from a public health standpoint would be at its maximum, protecting the remainder of individuals unable to receive or benefit from the vaccine. The current measles outbreak argues that either we are not properly screening or quarantining new cases of measles at the point of entry to the US or our herd immunity may be breaking down (or some combination of the above).

So, at your next social function, after you have debated your usual political concerns or dismay at your favorite NFL football team’s shocking choice in the recent NFL draft, settle in to a potentially more meaningful discussion around the ethics of personal autonomy versus public health policy regarding mandatory measles screening, quarantining and vaccination. Suggested sub-topics might include:

• Is it fair for those who are able to vaccinate but choose not to vaccinate to freely rely on the herd immunity of those that do vaccinate?
• How public should one’s vaccination or immunity status be to avoid quarantine?
• What reasons are reasonable to choose not to immunize?
• Would it be fair to deny public (or private) insurance coverage for treating the measles if one chose not to take the vaccine?

Parental Rights

By Neil Skjoldal

What rights do parents have when it comes to the medical care of their children?

This bioethical question has recently arisen in the case of Noah McAdams, a 3-year-old who has been diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.  According to news reports, the recommended treatment in his case is chemotherapy.  His parents decided that they did not want to pursue that course of treatment and took the child out of state for a different course of treatment. Noah’s mother, Taylor Bland-Ball, posted on social media that they were planning on treating him with “rosemary, vitamin B complex, herbal extract, colloidal silver and mushroom tea, among others,” according to the Tampa Bay Times.  In that article, Dr. Bijal D. Shahof Moffitt Cancer Center states,”I put it in the same box as those who fear vaccination . . . The reality is, what we risk by not taking chemotherapy, just as what we risk by not taking vaccines, is much, much worse.” 

State officials tracked down the parents in Kentucky and took Noah from them and placed him in the custody of his grandparents.  According to reports, a district judge would be making a ruling on the treatment issue. 

Bioethics wrestles with the relationship of an individual’s (or parents’) rights to the larger concerns of the state.  In an effort to denounce the state’s activity, some have called its actions “medical kidnapping.”  What role does the ethical principle of autonomy play in this case, even when the treatment is said to have a 90% success rate?  In some cases, (e.g., blood transfusions) the state steps in to authorize medical care that is deemed absolutely necessary.  Does this case meet that standard?  Not all the facts have been made known yet, but the judge will surely need wisdom in order to reach a just conclusion.

Physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, and the World Medical Association

The World Medical Association (WMA) is cogitating on physician-assisted suicide. Their current statement, adopted in 1992, “editorially revised” in 2005, and reaffirmed in 2015, is as follows:

Physician-assisted suicide, like euthanasia, is unethical and must be condemned by the medical profession. Where the assistance of the physician is intentionally and deliberately directed at enabling an individual to end his or her own life, the physician acts unethically. However the right to decline medical treatment is a basic right of the patient and the physician does not act unethically even if respecting such a wish results in the death of the patient.

WMA’s statement on euthanasia, adopted in 2002, and reaffirmed with minor revision in 2013, states

BE IT RESOLVED that:

The World Medical Association reaffirms its strong belief that euthanasia is in conflict with basic ethical principles of medical practice, and

The World Medical Association strongly encourages all National Medical Associations and physicians to refrain from participating in euthanasia, even if national law allows it or decriminalizes it under certain conditions.

Drama has been unfolding in recent months regarding these positions of the WMA. In October 2018, the Royal Dutch Medical Association (KNMG) and the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) together proposed that the WMA change its position to “neutrality.” This Proposed WMA Reconsideration of the Statement on Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Dying was retracted late in the process due to strong opposition.  The German Medical Association proposed a compromise of changes in the language. Those changes included “physician-assisted death” instead of “physician-assisted suicide,” and “physicians should not engage” in place of “unethical and should be condemned.”

The WMA decided to seek written opinions, and revisit the subject at the 2019 Council meeting. In a press release from 29 April 2019, the WMA Council announced that

It was agreed that policy work should continue on physician assisted suicide, augmented intelligence, violence against healthcare professionals and the patient-physician relationship.

With the next WMA Council and General Assembly scheduled for 23-26 October 2019 in Tbilisi, Georgia, observers should note the jockeying for position by various medical associations. It seems unlikely that those medical associations in jurisdictions where physician-assisted suicide or euthanasia are embraced would decrease pressure on the WMA. Yet we can hope that the World Medical Association will not succumb to such forces. After all, the WMA was formed in the shadow of World War II – a time when the raw wounds of incredibly inhuman acts by some humans against others had been recently seared into the minds of millions. The WMA needs to stay the course they set in 1946, for, to paraphrase George Santayana, those who do not learn from history are condemned to repeat it.

Men without chests

By Steve Phillips

One thing that is essential for us to be able to think well about bioethics is an understanding of who we are as human beings. One aspect of that which has been discussed on this forum is the concept of human dignity, the idea that all human beings have inherent value which impacts how we interact with each other ethically. For Christians that is grounded in the idea that we are all created in the image of God. John Kilner has expressed so very well how our being created in the image of God is the reason why people matter.

C. S. Lewis wrote about another aspect of how we understand ourselves as human beings back in 1947 in a little book titled The Abolition of Man. The first chapter of that book is titled “Men without Chests.” As a medieval scholar he was using a medieval image to express a concern that he had about how the tendency to deny the existence of objective moral truth in his day was leading to a problem with how we function as human beings. In the image that he is using the head represents intellect or reason, the chest (or heart) represents sentiments or values, and the stomach represents the appetites or desires. He says that if we believe that statements about morality or values are simply statements about how we feel and are not statements that can be considered objectively true or false, then the chest has lost its ability to mediate between the head and the stomach. Without objective moral values humans become beings whose intellect is used to achieve their desires without any means of controlling those desires.

What Lewis predicted is where much of our society is today. We are told that our identity is based on our desires, and that if we do not fulfill our desires then we are denying who we really are. Anyone who would suggest that our desires might be wrong or that we should not fulfill those desires must hate us and is attacking us and making us unsafe. Our desires define who we are, and our intellect is given the task of fulfilling those desires.

This is in stark contrast with a Christian concept of who we are as human beings. We understand that as human beings we are created by God in his image and with a purpose. We also understand that we are fallen. This world is not how it ought to be and we are not how we ought to be. Because we are fallen, our desires are frequently wrong. Our identity is not found in our desires, but in our relationship with our creator. We understand that our creator has given us the capacity to understand which of our desires are right and which are wrong. He has enabled our intellect to comprehend objective moral values that are grounded in the goodness of God’s nature. Those moral concepts allow us to distinguish right from wrong desires. That is what ethics is about. Those moral concepts also help us understand that we fall short of what we ought to be. We need help. That is what the gospel is all about. That is why Jesus died and rose again as we just celebrated at Easter.

The idea that our desires define who we are and must be fulfilled creates men without chests who are incapable of distinguishing right from wrong and can only express how they feel about a moral issue. We must have chests which hold to objective moral truths to think ethically and be complete human beings who are not simply ruled by our appetites.

Brain resuscitation (?) in pigs

By Jon Holmlund

The latest mind-blowing (seriously, no pun intended) report from the science literature is that a team of scientists at Yale Medical School have been able to use an artificial preservative solution to recover electrical activity in some of the cells of the brains from the severed heads of pigs that had been slaughtered for food.  This is absolutely stunning because the understanding—so widely accepted that the term “conventional wisdom” is trite in this case—that the brain’s need for oxygen, nutrients, and the blood flow that provides them is so massive, so constant that an interruption of even a few minutes means irreversible death of brain tissue.  This can be in part of the brain (as in a stroke), or the whole brain (as in brain death).  Your correspondent is not a neuroscientist, but understands that recent research is showing the human brain, anyway, to be more adaptable than historically understood, meaning that after an event like a stroke, function can be restored over time with rehabilitative efforts that support the remaining, undamaged brain tissue adapting to the damage.

In this case, it was four hours after the pigs’ deaths that the researchers isolated their brains and put them into the solutions.  Besides the electrical activity in some nerve cells, the researchers also found evidence that blood vessels could support circulation, and that there was metabolic (energy-using) activity in the isolated brains.  Evidence that the whole brain was working, and able to, for example, “feel” pain or detect stimuli, was not evident, but the researchers were not trying to do that.  Their immediate goal was apparently to understand how long brain cell function might be preserved.

Before we rush to invoke the immortal Viktor Frankenstein, it should be said that the researchers in this case appear to have carefully followed existing ethical guidelines for the research use of animals.  And it is tempting to speculate about this work leading to new treatments for brain injury.

Still, many ethical issues are raised.  What constraints should proper ethics of experimentation on animals put on future, similar experiments?  Is it acceptable to pursue a model for whole animal or even human brains preserved outside the body to study preservation and restoration of function, perhaps even to the point of trying to “jump start” the whole brain, as the current researchers speculate might be necessary.  Or, such a recovery might be impossible; they say they might just be observing an evitable process of brain death and decay.  Maybe it takes rather longer than previously appreciated.

That last point raises further concerns about how we understand when death has occurred.  Do current approaches toward harvesting human organs for transplantation, that may require that blood flow to the brain be interrupted for only a matter of minutes before declaring death of the donor, effectively jump the gun?  Might some people who are thought brain dead in fact have better chance of recovery than appreciated?  These questions already trouble ethicists thinking about how to determine when a person has died.

These are only a few of the concerns, and some authors this week are calling for an international review of the ethics of this work, before proceeding further with research on mammals—never mind humans, that’s not in view, yet.

A summary of the work for the non-specialist is openly available.  Summaries of related ethical issues, also openly available, can be found here and here.  The full scientific report in Nature requires subscription or purchase.

Are AI Ethics Unique to AI?

By Mark McQuain

A recent article in Forbes.com by Cansu Canca entitled “A New Model for AI Ethics in R&D” has me wondering whether the ethics needed for the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) requires some new method or model of thinking about the bioethics related to that discipline. The author, a principal in the consulting company AI Ethics Lab, implies that there might be. She believes that the traditional “Ethics Oversight and Compliance Review Boards”, which emerged as a response to the biomedical scandals of World War II and continue in her view to emphasize a heavy-handed, top-down, authoritative control over ethical decisions in biomedical research, leave AI researchers effectively out-of-the-ethical-decision-making loop.

In support of her argument, she cites the recent working document of AI Ethics Guidelines by the European Commission’s High-Level Expert Group on Artificial Intelligence (AI HLEG). AI HLEG essentially distilled their AI ethical guidelines down to the familiar: Respect for Autonomy, Beneficence, Non-Maleficence, and Justice, as well as one new principle: Explicability. She downplays Explicability as simply the means to realize the other four principles. I think the demand for Explicability is interesting in its own right and will comment on that below.

Canca sees the AI HLEG guidelines as simply a rehash of the same principles of bioethics available to current bioethics review boards, which, in her view, are limited in that they provide no guidance for such a board when one principle conflicts with another. She is also frustrated that the ethical path researchers are permitted continues to be determined by an external governing board, implying that “researchers cannot be trusted and…focuses solely on blocking what the boards consider to be unethical.” She wants a more collaborative interaction between researchers and ethicists (and presumably a review board) and outlines how her company would go about achieving that end.

Faulting the “Principles of Biomedical Ethics” for failing to be determinant on how to resolve conflicts between the four principles is certainly not a problem unique to AI. In fact, Beauchamp and Childress repeatedly explicitly pointed out that the principles cannot be independently determinant on these types of inter-principle conflicts. This applies to every field in biomedical ethics.

Having an authoritative, separate ethical review board was indeed developed, at least in part, because at least some individual biomedical researchers in the past were untrustworthy. Some still are. We have no further to look than the recent Chinese researcher He Jiankui, who allegedly created and brought to term the first genetically edited twins. Even top-down, authoritative oversight failed here.

I do think Canca is correct in trying to educate both the researchers and their companies about bioethics in general and any specific bioethical issues involved in a particular research effort. Any effort to openly identify bioethical issues and frankly discuss potential bioethical conflicts at the outset should be encouraged.

Finally, the issue of Explicability related to AI has come up in this blog previously. Using the example of programming a driverless car, we want to know, explicitly, how the AI controlling that car is going to make decisions, particularly if it must decide how to steer the car in a no-win situation that will result in the death of either occupants inside the car or bystanders on the street. What we are really asking is: “What ethical parameters/decisions/guidelines were used by the programmers to decide who lives and who dies?” I imagine we want this spelled-out explicitly in AI because, by their nature, AI systems are so complex that the man on the Clapham omnibus (as well as the bioethicist sitting next to him) has no ability to determine these insights independently.

Come to think about it, Explicability should also be demanded in non-AI bioethical decision-making for much the same reason.

The Importance of Bioethics

by Chris Audino

Every time I am about to stand in front of a fresh batch of students in my undergrad Bioethics class, I am moved to ask myself the question: what’s the point in Bioethics? The reason I ask this question is because it is an important question.

It is important because the asking encourages the essential exercise of me remembering “the why.” Why am I doing this? Why do we reflect on the moral permissibility of certain behaviors (culturally accepted or not)? Why do we allow certain things to happen and not others as individuals and a culture? Who should be allowed to decide what is right and what is wrong?

This “why” speaks to the very heart of bioethics – to the point of bioethics, which, I humbly submit, is to think about health and medical issues, and their moral permissibility, with the goal of supporting human flourishing and dignity. Bioethics is the exercise of asking these questions before it becomes a hindsight question. You know, when we ask: what else could I have done, it seemed like the only choice?

The further we drift from asking these questions the less it seems like there is a choice. Because, the day to day is where these decisions happen. The tech in the lab creating a family (am I playing God?). The nurse sitting by the bedside watching a man agonizing through his last breaths (he shouldn’t have to suffer through this, what can I do?). The engineer who is trying to solve this simple problem (I don’t think this could be used to hurt someone, could it?). The mother who is watching her 6-year-old slowly die of cancer (wouldn’t it be easier if I could help him die?). The expecting mom who has been abandoned by her boyfriend to go it alone (what choice do I have?). The biological boy who identifies as a female and is sorting through pronouns to find the right fit for the moment (why do I have to go through this?).

Bioethics is important because it asks the question before the moment. In the moment, the decision seems like it has already been made.