Fewer U.S. Twins and the Development of IVF

Readers of this blog may have seen the report in the general press that, after three decades of increases, the rate of twin births in the U.S. has declined by 4% from 2014 to 2018.

Those three decades correspond to the era of IVF, since the birth of Louise Brown in England in 1978.  It seems likely that changes in IVF practice contributes at least in part, if not substantially, to the trend in twin births.

Specifically, doctors at IVF clinics are more commonly implanting only one, rather than more than one, embryo back into a prospective mother’s womb with each attempt at a live birth.  Multiple pregnancies—even twins, not just “Octomom” scenarios—carry increased risk for mother and babies.  Previously, two or more embryos were implanted in an effort to increase the chance that at least one would make it to live birth.  Sometimes, “selective abortion” was practiced to reduce the number of initially multiple pregnancies to one.  Now, it appears that gradually increasing success rates of IVF are supporting single-embryo transfer as a standard practice.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which provides a substantial amount of information on the current status of IVF on its website, summarizes the changes in the percentage of single-embryo transfers in recent years—increasing from 11.6% of non-donor-egg transfers in 2007 to 39.9% in 2016.

To the extent that this reduces the practice of selective abortion and, one hopes, decreases the number of embryos created but kept frozen, never to be born, at IVF clinics, this is a welcome development.  The Christian Medical Dental Association takes the position that, in IVF, the number of embryos should be kept to a minimum, and all embryos created should be so created with the intent of having the genetic mother carry all of them in pregnancy, to live birth one hopes.

IVF remains a transformative enabling technology that facilitates contractual arrangements for reproduction, profound changes in the structure of families, and the use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis to control what sort of people are allowed to be born.  One might view these developments as non-physical harms, that alter our overall experience of being human in ways that may properly be subject to question.

And: the rate of twin birth is still twice what it was in 1980.  If one sees a mom or dad pushing a stroller with fraternal twins, chances are they are IVF kids.

Screening that benefits the screener

I teach it course on human diseases for students in a public health program. One of the things that we talk about is asymptomatic disease. If a disease has no symptoms the only way that we can detect it is by screening. For screening to be beneficial it needs to be able to detect asymptomatic diseases accurately and there needs to be something which can be done that will help those in whom the asymptomatic disease is diagnosed. Many times, a screening test will only be accurate if the test is used to screen a selected population which is at risk. Sometimes there are asymptomatic diseases which we can detect accurately, but the people diagnosed do not benefit because there is not something we can do to make their life better than it would be if the asymptomatic disease had not been diagnosed. Since the purpose of screening is to help people, there is no reason to do it if the people being screened will not be helped. That idea is based on the principle of beneficence. Everything that we do in medicine should be done for the benefit of the person being treated.

Some people do not follow that moral principle. There have always been some who have used the practice of medicine to benefit themselves more than those they were treating. That is why the Hippocratic physicians had to put a statement about beneficence in their oath. One of the ways that the principle of beneficence can be violated is for some people to encourage other people to do screening that will not benefit those being screened but will benefit the one doing the screening. One of the examples I see most often is supposedly low cost ultrasound screening for such things as carotid stenosis. Those doing the screening can make a significant amount of money by screening everyone who will accept their pitch but the people being screened do not benefit. It is currently not recommended to screen for asymptomatic carotid stenosis because there is no evidence that intervention is beneficial for those who are diagnosed and some evidence that intervention may cause more harm than good.

As new technology is developed it is subject to being used in a way that violates the principle of beneficence. One of the new ways to do that is with genetic screening. A recent article in the health news section of Reuters.com describes the fraudulent promotion of genetic screening to older adults in the US. Again, this is screening being done to benefit screeners who have collected huge sums from Medicare while providing no benefit to those being screened.

These abuses do not mean that we should not do screening. It simply means that screening should be done the right way. We should choose which screening tests we use and which people we screen with those tests based on how the screening will benefit those who are being screened. We should not do it to benefit those who are doing the screening.

Why do we do this?

Many of the posts on this blog involve cautions that there are things in medicine which we are capable of doing and which some want to do that we should not do. Much of the time those cautions go unheeded by our society. For fifty years we have been saying that we should not perform abortions, but many unborn human beings continue to lose their lives. We give reasons why we should not do euthanasia, but PAS becomes legal in state after state. We write about why we should not alter the genes of human embryos, but the research continues. Is it just that we are anti-medical science and like telling people what they should do?

No. We do it out of love. Sometimes it is love and concern for people who are powerless and cannot speak for themselves. It is because of our love for the person who is aborted as a fetus or comes into being as the result of a genetic manufacturing project rather than being accepted unconditionally as a gift. It is out of love for the Canadian man who chooses euthanasia because he cannot obtain the 24 hour a day care he needs to live life with ALS.

It is also out of love for those who do things that are wrong. Love for the physician who performs abortions or euthanasia. Love for the researcher who uses human embryos as research subjects destined to die. We do it for the sake of the gospel which tells us that we have all done wrong and are destined for judgment unless someone intervenes. The gospel that tells us Jesus did intervene by his death and resurrection and has made forgiveness and restoration available to all who confess their wrongdoing and put our trust in him. We do it for those who will miss out on the amazing grace of the God who died for us if they listen to a culture that says that anything you desire to do is right and there is no need to ask for forgiveness for anything.

“Velvet Eugenics”

Human Flourishing in an Age of Gene Editing is a new collection of essays, edited by Erik Parens and Josephine Johnson.  In the introduction, the editors explain they are concerned with “nonphysical harms” of human gene editing.  That is, these harms would not affect bodily systems, but harm “people’s psyches…[their] experiences of being persons,” and could impair human flourishing.  These harms could be incurred not only by gene editing but also by use of other “reprogenic” technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and prenatal diagnosis.

Your correspondent has just begun to read this collection.  In the first entry, “Welcoming the Unexpected,” bioethicist Rosemarie Garland-Thomson of Emory University, takes the view that flourishing is not a matter of proximity to some ideal of health or human excellence, but is, for each person, a growing into expression of that person’s unique capabilities.  Accordingly, rather than embrace a project of eliminating disabilities, society should work to make the environment more welcoming to people with those conditions—many of which, after all, need not impair a person’s ability to live a life of happiness and contribution to others.  Communities have an obligation, she says, “to support the distinctiveness of its members according to the egalitarian principles of justice, liberty, and equality,” and “build environments that…support the widest spectrum of embodiments…in which human embodied existence can successfully thrive as it is.”  Put another way, we should not be building a regime in which we are deciding what sort of people we will allow to be born, but we should be ready to welcome and embrace the ones who are.  In this, Professor Garland-Thomson sounds a “caution against an aggressive normalization imperative…an outlook of humility about the human capacity to control future circumstances through present action…against the arrogance of [what one writer called] ‘the danger of a single story.'”

We should, she writes, adopt a stance of “growing” rather than “making” human beings, and “reconsider the logic of a velvet eugenics that would standardize human variation in the interest of individual, market-driven liberty and at the expense of social justice and the common good.”  In this, she embraces the argument of contemporary German philosopher Jurgen Habermas that rejects “a liberal eugenics regulated by supply and demand.”  One can be forgiven for hearing in this an echo of C.S. Lewis’s worries about “conditioners” in The Abolition of Man.

This is set in the author’s description of her ongoing friendship with three other women, all, like her, married PhD’s who like good wine, good food, and are amply supported by technology and community.  One of her friends is congenitally deaf, another has hereditary blindness, the third has a genetic muscular condition, and the author herself was born with what is now called “complicated ectodactyly,” with “asymmetric unusual hands and forearms.”  The sort of thing your correspondent understands the Chinese to be trying to eliminate through the use of PGD.

A remarkable essay to lead off a collection that appears worthy of careful consideration.

Stem Cell Rx No Longer For Sale on Google

Perhaps once a week, I will be asked by a patient about the potential benefits of stem cells for reversing the normal affects of age, particularly with respect to arthritis of the knee joints, hip joints or the degenerative discs in the lumbar spine. I believe one of the reasons for this interest has come from increasing advertisements by various clinics in my region of East Tennessee claiming stem cells are the answer for these problems. My region is not unique. A simple Google search on “stem cells for knee pain” yields ads for clinics offering such treatment.

Stem cells are cells that have potential to become any type of cell in the human body such as a new blood cell, nerve cell or bone/cartilage cell. Scientists are rapidly learning how to find or create stem cells, as well as how to safely use them to replace old or missing cells, thus restoring function in worn out, damaged or diseased areas of the body. In fact, stem cells are presently used to replace the bone marrow for some individuals with certain cancers and disorders of the blood and immune system, and in many of these cases, the results are lifesaving.

The problem is that stem cell treatment remains yet unproven in all other medical conditions, including the age-related arthritis conditions which I treat. This lack of efficacy has not stopped clinics from offering and patients from receiving stem cell injections with the hope of achieving improved function or cure. I am willing to grant that many offer these treatments with the sincere hope and belief that they are acting in their patient’s best interest, though I suspect not all have the patient’s best interest in mind. Unfortunately, there have been severe adverse events. Examples include blindness following an injection of stem cells into the eye, and loss of function with development of a spinal cord tumor following stem cell injection into the spine.

The FDA is trying to educate the public and prevent stem cells from being offered for unproven treatments. The FDA has the authority in the US to stop these unproven treatments and take punitive action if needed. This is not to suggest that the FDA is in the business of preventing legitimate investigation into the potential benefits of stem cells, such as this Mayo Clinic Phase 1 study looking at the risks of injecting stem cells in to the cerebrospinal fluid of patients following a spinal cord injury to see if this particular stem cell technique causes harm (with future studies needed to determine benefit).

The FDA is recently getting some help from Google. On September 6th, Google announced it would stop accepting ads for unproven medical treatments, including stem cell therapies. It is early in the effort and the initial link above still has four ads for non-bone marrow stem cell treatments returned with the Google search. Maybe by the time you read this blog entry, the stem cell ads for unproven treatments will be gone.

I am hopeful that stem cells will eventually provide patients with safe therapies that repair injury and return patients to normal health. Offering that promise without the studies that prove such benefit is unethical and potentially harmful. It is good to see Google favoring human welfare over financial profit.

Two developments

A new effort at “somatic” gene editing in China is reported this week.  The key summary:

“As the researchers report in the New England Journal of Medicine,

[note to reader: subscription required]

they transplanted [blood stem] cells that had undergone CRISPR-based editing [of a gene that encodes for a receptor, or “docking station”] into a patient with HIV and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. While [the edited cells lasted for a long time in the bloodstream of the HIV-infected recipient], they only made up between 5 percent and 8 percent of blood cells. A higher percentage is needed for this to be an HIV cure…”

In “somatic” gene editing, mature cells, such as “adult stem cells” or diseased tissues, are gene edited for the purples of treating a fully-formed individual with a disease.  That is what appears to be in view here.  Similar efforts are in progress to treat sickle cell anemia and other genetic diseases.  The ethical issues are relatively well-understood, and fit within the regime of regulating cells-as-medicines in clinical trials of humans, under the ethical and regulatory regime that governs the latter.

That’s in contrast to “heritable” gene editing, which attempts to edit genes in embryos, fertilized eggs (zygotes), or gametes (sperm or eggs) with changes that would be passed on through the generations, as recent entries on this blog have been addressing.  The Chinese twin girls who were reported to have undergone gene editing late in 2018 are examples of an attempt at “heritable” gene editing.

A second report from Nature describes efforts to use human “reprogrammed” stem cells, aka pluripotent stem cells, to make human “embryo-like structures.”  This is distinct from making a human embryo, for example in IVF, then removing cells, likely destroying it, for use in research or to develop medical treatments.  In conservative commentaries in recent years, these “reprogrammed” stem cells are considered the “ethical embryonic stem cells,” because they can’t form a full individual and they don’t require creation and destruction of an embryo, that would under normal circumstances form a full individual.

Thing is, these “embryo-like structures” can still form something called a “primitive streak,” which, in normal embryos, is the first sign of formation of a nervous system.  The primitive streak usually forms 14 days after fertilization, so, to try to avoid concerns about research on embryos, scientists who think such research is ethical in limited circumstances have operated under a “14-day rule”–voluntary in the US, mandated by law in the UK–after which embryos would not be destroyed for research.  These “embryo-like structures” may form a primitive streak, it appears.  The situation is similar to “synthetic human entities with embryo-like features,” or “SHEEFs,” which may bypass the primitive streak but raise similar issues of whether something too like a natural human being is being engineered by this work for it to be ethical.

A developmental biologist at Caltech says, the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. “We will have to confront ourselves with the question of what is a human embryo, and whether these models really have the potential to develop into one.”  The researchers making these synthetic embryos argue that they lack a placenta and other cells needed for development, so could not develop into a person.

At least for now.

Heritable genome editing: a too-short list of 12 questions

Last week, I discussed efforts by a US/UK commission formed to recommend a framework for regulating and monitoring heritable human gene editing.  This commission has called for “expert evidence” to assist them in the task “to develop a framework for considering technical, scientific, medical, regulatory, and ethical requirements for human germline genome editing, should society conclude such applications are acceptable.”  The deadline is September 27, 2019 to make recommendations.  The website to do so appears open to the public. 

Now, I suppose the commission will ultimately decide who qualifies as an “expert,” and several of the questions are decidedly technical.  But I submit that many who read this blog qualify as experts in bioethics or in some aspect of biomedicine, and will be able to offer considered responses to at least some of the questions.  So I encourage readers of this blog to access the link and weigh in.

I have yet to complete my effort.  I started last week, then pulled back in the middle.  Responses to each question appear to be submitted in real time, and the possibility to save work (there are ‘”back” and “next” buttons) for future editing seemed unclear.  And these questions merit careful responses.  So I decided to wait for another day—before the September 27 deadline!

If you would like to mull over possible responses in advance of trying to offer them online, I have copied them here, for advance thinking before submitting at the online portal, or to inform reflection and discussion otherwise:

  1. Which diseases and conditions, if any, do you see as appropriate for human germline genome editing?
  2. If there were to be an appropriate use case for human germline genome editing, what evidence would be needed to proceed to first in human use?
  3. What is the status of editing mechanisms for early stage human embryos (e.g., using different editing techniques, improving homology directed repair, etc.)? What are the factors that predict whether single nucleotide changes or other intended modifications in human embryos will be correct? To what extent will genome editing affect the viability of embryos?
  4. What is the status of the technology for validating that a correct edit (on target characterization) has been made and that unintended edits (e.g., off target effects, mosaicism, etc.) have not occurred in a range of cell and tissue types? If possible, please provide evidence drawn from work on induced pluripotent stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and/or early stage human embryos.
  5. What is the status of generating cell lines from human and non-human germline stem cells?
  6. How might animal models inform the editing in human embryos (inclusive of analysis of phenotypic correction)?
  7. To what extent do different genetic backgrounds affect success and phenotypic outcomes after genome editing?
  8. What is the success rate of full-term pregnancies following pre-implantation genetic diagnosis? What affects this (e.g., age, number of oocytes harvested, technique used, etc.)?
  9. What are the appropriate mechanisms for obtaining informed consent, long-term monitoring of the future children, assessing potential effects in subsequent generations, and addressing untoward effects? Are there best practices from: a) assisted reproductive technologies; b) pre-implantation genetic diagnosis; c) gene transfer research for children; d) mitochondrial replacement therapy; and e) somatic genome editing?
  10. How should we think about the inter-generational medical (e.g., genetic changes to the genome) and ethical implications of human germline genome editing (e.g., potential harms and benefits)? How should the rights of future generations and the wider human population be taken into account?
  11. What international oversight structures would need to be in place to facilitate, in a responsible way, a path forward for germline genome editing?
  12. Are there any topics or issues that are not covered by the above questions that you think the Commission should attend to during its deliberations?

This last question, of course, is the most pregnant of all.  The list of questions is so technical, so question-begging about whether heritable gene editing should be done at all, that the commission should receive carefully-considered reflections on the meaning of the potential enterprise, how the future practice of heritable genome editing should not be a foregone conclusion, and how and why the right answer to “when should we edit human genes heritably” might well be “never.”

By all means, reader of this blog, go online and offer what you reasonably can to this important discussion!

Much going on about heritable genome editing

The first meeting of the International Commission on the Clinical Use of Human Germline Genome Editing was held in Washington, DC on August 13.  This is a US/UK commission convened by the UK Royal Society, the US National Academy of Medicine, and the US National Academy of the Sciences.  Space for in-person attendance at these meetings appears limited, but information is freely accessible on the internet.  For example, the meeting materials and videos from the August 13 can be accessed here, and one can register to be on the Commission’s mailing list at this link. 

It is challenging for anyone with a “day job” whose work is not dedicated to the field of gene editing to try to keep up with developments, so the open access to information is welcome.  The August 13 meeting included numerous basic science discussions as well as some from biotechnology companies seeking to develop gene editing approaches.  As discussed often on this blog and elsewhere, so-called “somatic” gene editing—that is, gene therapy of fully-formed individuals by editing an undesirable gene such as one known to cause disease–appears generally to fall within the existing regime of human research ethics and regulation and pose relatively few unique ethical issues.   The day included industry presentations regarding somatic gene editing, either “in vivo”—involving injecting the gene editor into a person—or “ex vivo”—involving removing cells from a person, editing the cells in the medical lab, then re-injecting the gene-edited cells into the person’s body as a form of treatment.  In neither case is the editing inherited across generations, avoiding the larger issues of manipulating human beings more fundamentally, and, as your present correspondent has consistently argued, unacceptably.

Even for somatic gene editing, however, “getting it right” in the form of editing the genes intended, and only those, and developing approaches to assess and control for longer-term or unintended risks is still a substantial set of tasks, as was described in a presentation by an official from the FDA.

The day also included a presentation from the separate World Health Organization multidisciplinary advisory panel, which held its first meeting in March 2019 with another one having been due this week in Geneva, Switzerland.  At the March meeting, the WHO panel adopted three main recommendations for developing oversight of human genome editing:

  • Establish a structured mechanism for collecting and curating details about proposed and ongoing research;
  • “it would be irresponsible at this time for anyone to proceed with clinical applications [they mean trying to establish a pregnancy or birth] of human germline genome editing”
  • Establish approaches to obtain input from the “broadest possible range of stakeholders” and “explore opportunities for an open, online mechanism for seeking input.”

All that said, the Salk Institute in San Diego is working on a new technique of editing, called SATI (short for intercellular linearized Single homology Arm donor mediated intron-Targeting Integration [say THAT three times fast!], which is expected to be more versatile than the current “preferred” technique called CRISPR-Cas9.  Biologic details between the two differ, but the ethical issues mainly apply to applications, and are therefore the same for both.  But don’t be surprised if you hear about “SATI” for 5-10 minutes in the news sometime.

And scientists at Cornell Medical Center in New York City are trying to gene-edit human sperm to alter the characteristics of children conceived using them.  Pressing ahead with getting ready for the WHO panel’s “clinical applications.”

Mildred Solomon of the Hastings Center has recently added her voice to those pointing out that whether heritable human genome editing should ever be done is not just a matter of weighing benefits vs risks, but involves much more momentous possibilities that should give us pause.  The key graphs:

“Even as [the WHO and US/UK commissions] regroup to produce clearer guidance, however, I sense a shift in the debate. For a very long time, the scientific and bioethical consensus was that we must not do human germ-line modifications—that we should not change gametes and embryos in ways that would be permanent, affecting all future generations. In contrast, somatic modifications, which affect only the person in whom the edits are made, have been mainly uncontroversial.

But that border between germ-line and somatic genome modification is blurring; the zeitgeist feels different. There is a growing sense of inevitability that we will eventually do human germ-line modification and that our only obligation is to wait until it is safe. When that day comes, we may want to make permanent heritable changes to the human species to eradicate otherwise intractable diseases. We should, however, enter this discussion with eyes wide open, considering each application on its own merits and anticipating a wide range of issues that go well beyond safety. Many of these issues are explored in Human Flourishing in an Age of Gene Editing, which will be published by Oxford University Press on August 28, 2019.”

I’m willing to forgive the plug for a book from people at Dr. Solomon’s institution, which is where the editors of the book in question work.  It looks worth checking out.  In the meantime, the US/UK commission has called for “expert evidence” to assist them in the task “to develop a framework for considering technical, scientific, medical, regulatory, and ethical requirements for human germline genome editing, should society conclude such applications are acceptable.”  Follow this link to have a look at their questions.

Baseball Statistics, Racism and 23andMe

I enjoy watching baseball on TV or even listening to a game on the radio. I am amused by the discussions of the announcers, usually around the 8th or 9th inning, particularly when the result of the game is already decided due to a lopsided score. The announcers begin doling out complex baseball statistics. As a former math and engineering student in college, I find this part of the game fascinating.

“Well John, I think this may be the first time Cincinnati Reds player Yasiel Puig has ever been involved in a late-game brawl with the entire Pittsburgh Pirates bench so soon after being traded to the Cleveland Indians earlier during tonight’s game and just 14 days after a Full Moon to boot.”

In baseball, as in life, if you specify an event in sufficient detail with enough variables, you are accurately characterizing that unique event. Some diehard baseball fans argue that with enough baseball statistics, the predictability of the outcome of any future game will become trivial.

In blog-related news, the New England Journal of Medicine recently had two thought-provoking “Perspective” opinion pieces dealing with racism in medicine. The first by medical student D.W. Paul, Jr. is entitled Ghosts of Our Collective Subconscious – What Blackface in a Yearbook Photo Means for Medical Education and the second by Dr. Tara Vijayan entitled ”Browner” – Creating Narratives of Race. Both are unfortunately available by subscription only. Among other things, both articles point out the obvious problems that occur when we reflexively categorize individuals by a single variable – such as one’s skin color – and attempt to predict current or future reality by that single variable. Habitually trivializing people in this manner results in prejudice, bias and bigotry.

This would never happen in baseball. For instance, I have yet to hear the following from an announcer:

“Well John, looking at the stat sheet on this next relief pitcher for the Pirates, it just says he’s white. For our radio listeners, from where I’m sitting, I must say our statisticians have nailed it as he is one of the whitest relief pitchers I’ve ever seen”.

I can promise you that when Yasiel Puig steps up to the plate, he doesn’t care about that relief pitcher’s skin color. He is far more concerned about the speed of his fast ball or the spin rate of his curve ball.

Enter 23andMe (or similar service). For the first time, the average person can send in a sample of saliva and get back a detailed DNA graph and report revealing the multiple countries of origin of their great grandparents and beyond. Having readily available DNA information may not be completely without its problems, and this blog has touched on some of these in past postings. However, one benefit of this technology may well be to convince people that we are a kaleidoscope of genetic material, much more complex, and far more interrelated, than our skin color alone would suggest.

If we are not going to treat our neighbors with the respect and dignity due unique image bearers of God, let us at least stop treating them as if they have only one variable worth considering – the color of their skin – and begin treating them like they have complex baseball statistics. Maybe then we will more accurately describe them, and, in doing so, perhaps better understand and appreciate them.

We should start now and not wait until the 9th inning.

“Safe” gene editing

The New England Journal of Medicine carries a brief article about “Controlling CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Editing” (subscription required).  The upshot: RNA used as a medicine, as in the case of “CRISPR” to edit genes, can hang around well after administration, and alter genes other than the ones intended to be altered.  These “off-target” effects could lead to unwanted clinical side effects.  You’d like to be able to shut the RNA medicine off.  Pharmaceutical companies that make and develop medicines from short RNA sequences have been doing just that—creating “antidotes,” if you’ll pardon the expression (bad use of the word, really—an antidote is to a poison, and the medicines are not poisons)—to reverse unwanted off-target effects of their medicines, should such effects occur.

Using CRISPR for gene editing to treat known genetic disease raises a similar concern, and the NEJM article cites a recent experiment indicating that such a “reversing agent” for CRISPR, if needed, might indeed be feasible.  So, suppose you are trying to treat someone with genetically-caused blindness, and there’s a risk that other genes might be affected.  You could give the “reversing agent” to block that.  Cool.  You’d want to get it into the right tissues—the right parts of the body—but the work described in NEJM suggests that might all be reality eventually. 

One challenge is: these RNA-based agents don’t always get into the parts of the body, or into cells, all that well.  The NEJM writer says that this new work into “controlling” CRISPR-based gene editing “of course, depends on the [reversing agent] delivery problem being solved, but that is a topic for another day.”

It’s been some time since your correspondent worked for a drug company making RNA-based drugs, and I’m not close to the work these days, but I would say that is most definitely a topic for another day.

So, why bring this up in a bioethics forum?  Because it’s one more matter that would need to be considered and addressed before charging into gene editing that can be inherited from generation to generation.  This, as the present writer has repeatedly held, is something that that the human race should never do.

But it’s bowling along.  The latest reports are that attempts to edit genes babies of deaf couples to prevent them from being born with genetic deafness are nigh in Russia.  Understandable, laudable goal, but we should not think that control of the process is nigh.   edium