Abortion, Res judicata, Stare decisis and the “Rightness of Things”

Oddly, I enjoy reading Supreme Court decisions, particularly the dissents, even though I am not a lawyer. I gain similar enjoyment watching a good game of chess even though I am not a great chess player. Nerd that I am, I think I become smarter for the effort in both cases. I beg the reader’s indulgence on the legal background before getting to the ethical or theological portion of this blog entry but, after all, the case regards abortion, which usually demands a legal “walk in the weeds”.

Three weeks ago, the New York Times reported on a recent Supreme Court decision (June Medical Services, LLC et al v. Russo) that struck down a Louisiana law that attempted to place restrictions upon physicians who perform abortions by requiring them to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals in case there were complications. In overturning the law, Judge Breyer, writing for the 5-4 majority opinion, made the case that requiring physicians to have said admitting privileges would reduce the number of physicians performing abortions in Louisiana, creating a burden on access to abortion. He was able to cite precedent with an almost identical Texas law that was struck down by the Court in 2016 (Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt)

There are many legal and ethical rabbit holes to explore in both cases. For the sake of brevity, I have picked one. Chief Justice Roberts was the fifth and deciding vote for the majority in the present case. What makes this interesting is that he joined the dissent in the earlier Texas decision, a decision he admits that he remains convinced was decided incorrectly, but voted recently with the majority to use the precedent of that prior case to strike down the Louisiana law. He wrote a separate concurring opinion to explain himself. In it, he begins:

“I joined the dissent in Whole Woman’s Health and continue to believe that the case was wrongly decided. The question today however is not whether Whole Woman’s Health was right or wrong, but whether to adhere to it in deciding the present case.”

My translation of this is: “Our first decision was terrible but instead of fixing our error, we should make a second terrible decision based upon the first – that way, at least we are consistent.”

And, legally, consistent they are.

Roberts’ problem with the Supreme Court’s Texas decision rested not with the specific medical or ethical questions as to whether physicians performing abortions should have admitting privileges at local hospitals or whether such requirement truly placed a limiting burden on women seeking abortion but rather the legal technicality of whether or not those questions had been previously and properly adjudicated. Res judicata (claim preclusion) prevents cases from being (potentially repeatedly) re-adjudicated between the same parties. Roberts joined Alito’s dissent, arguing the Texas case was an example of res judicata and should never have been heard. In Alito’s words: “The Court favor[ed the] petitioners with a victory that they did not have the audacity to seek”

With the Texas decision now law, Robert’s recent decision was to give precedent to that previous decision. Stare decisis (“to stand by things decided”) allows us to rely that courts will not change laws erratically. Robert’s sixteen page separate concurring opinion decided the Court’s 5-4 recent decision and was his attempt to justify giving precedent to a previous case he still believes was wrongly decided. Justices Thomas, Alito, Gorsuch and Kavanaugh each wrote dissents effectively having none of his argument.

All this brings me to the bioethics portion of this blog entry regarding this case. If Supreme Court decisions are not concerned with determining right and wrong (per Roberts), then what are they concerned with? Decisions having to do with abortion literally have lives hanging in the judicial balance. Justice Thomas, writing in his dissent in Whole Woman’s Health said:

“Our law is now so riddled with special exceptions for special rights that our decisions deliver neither predictability nor the promise of a judiciary bound by the rule of law.”

He went even further in his dissent in this present case, stating that the Court was unbound by the Constitution itself, when the Court concluded…

“…that Louisiana’s law is unconstitutional under our precedents. But those decisions created the right to abortion out of whole cloth, without a shred of support from the Constitution’s text. Our abortion precedents are grievously wrong and should be overruled.”

Justice Thomas is indirectly talking about the legitimacy of the Court. Theologian Richard John Neuhaus discussed the problems of legitimacy that courts will face when the Law deviates from what he called the “Rightness of Things”. In a speech he delivered at the centennial celebration of the School of Law at Valparaiso University in the late 1970s, he concluded (as do I):

“[W]ith regard to law, there is nothing in store but a continuing and deepening crisis of legitimacy if courts persist in systematically ruling out of order the moral traditions in which western law has developed and which bears, for the overwhelming majority of the American people, this society’s sense of right and wrong. There is in store a continuing and deepening crisis unless a transcendent moral purpose is reasserted by which the state can be brought under critical judgment, unless it is made clear once again that the state is not the source but the servant of the law.

“With apologies to Spinoza, transcendence abhors a vacuum. Today there is such a vacuum in the public space of American law and politics. Unless it is democratically filled by the living moral traditions of the American people, it will surely be filled, as has so tragically happened elsewhere, by the pretensions of the modern state. As the crisis of legitimacy deepens it will lead — not next year, maybe not in twenty, but all too soon —to totalitarianism or to insurrection or to both.”

The Problem with Retractions

It is not uncommon, at least in my small town, for our local newspaper to publish, usually on its front page, the news of a malpractice case, complete with the initial accusations of incompetence directed against the physician in question and description of the horrible medical outcome suffered by the patient. The physician’s reputation is at least called into question, if not ruined, by accusations that appear at the time to be accurate reporting of the factual events. In most of these cases, often after one or two years of lengthy court proceedings, the physician is found to be completely innocent of any wrong doing. The newspaper, if they publish a follow-up at all, place a short update article buried in an obscure section in the middle of the paper. That article rarely has the excitement and prominence of the initial article and the physician’s reputation remains tarnished or at least clouded despite the absence of any wrong doing or error on his or her part.

Similarities can be seen with retractions in prominent medical journals, with obviously more national or international impact. Take the recent publications in both the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and the Lancet of reportedly large population studies showing both the lack of efficacy and potential life-threatening side-effects of hydroxychloroquine in treating COVID-19. Both of these studies were reported by all of the national news networks in the US, further fueling the ongoing oddly hyper-political situation that has plagued the COVID-19 pandemic.

This past week, both the NEJM and the Lancet posted retractions of the COVID-19 hydroxychloroquine studies. In similar fashion to the malpractice articles in my local newspaper, the retractions, at least initially, did not receive the secondary reporting enjoyed by the original articles. To their credit, the Lancet stamped “RETRACTED” over the link to the original article and provided an explanation of their retraction. The NEJM only placed a small thin red banner with small text “This article has been retracted” above the article at the original link, which I overlooked when I first viewed the original link.

Lack of fanfare is not the only problem with the retracted medical studies. As reported recently in Science, the data in the flawed Lancet article has affected other ongoing reputable studies:

“But the Lancet paper, despite its retraction, will make it more difficult to continue current trials, [says Nicholas White, who runs one of the largest pre-exposure prophylaxis trials of hydroxychorquine for COVID-19]. Published on 22 May, the [now retracted Lancet] study claimed, supposedly based on data from 96,000 patients around the world, that hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, whether given alone or in combination with another drug, caused a steep increase in deaths. That led many regulatory agencies to ask scientists to halt their trials and make sure they were not harming their patients. Recovery and Solidarity [other ongoing studies] were temporarily halted but resumed after a safety committee took a look at the data… Many other studies are still on pause.”

The point in today’s blog entry is not to determine whether hydroxychloroquine should be used to treat COVID-19 or to solve the politization of the COVID-19 pandemic. Rather, like the previous blog entry on “Trust and the Pandemic”, it is to point out that retracted studies in reputable medical journals, published for whatever reason, deserve substantially more attention when they are retracted than the follow-up given to small town malpractice headlines. While discovering the truth is important in both cases, failure to correct the latter only affects the reputation of an honest small town physician; failure to correct the former may affect the health and welfare of us all.

Essential Services

Until the pandemic, no one spent much time wondering about whether something was an “essential service”. This designation has granted necessary special exceptions to community mobility access restrictions created by government imposed “shelter-in-place“ orders instituted to slow the spread of the virus. Throughout the pandemic, determining what was and still is considered essential has been an interesting debate not without its bioethical issues .

Merriam-Webster Dictionary says that the adjective essential “implies belonging to the very nature of a thing and therefore being incapable of removal without destroying the thing itself or its character.” With respect to the COVID-19 pandemic, an essential service is one that provides for or protects the life of any person, as life is certainly one thing that everyone seems to agree pertains to the nature of a human being. Therefore, anyone whose job it is to provide for or protect the life of another is providing an essential service. Easily included in that group are those at the front lines of disease management such as doctors, nurses, and first responder EMTs. The list also requires jobs that provide distribution or protection of our daily needs such as grocers (“milk and bread”), pharmacies, utility workers, various government services, firefighters, police, transportation services and nursing home providers. The list then quickly expands to suppliers of those jobs like farmers, medical equipment manufacturers, gas stations, and, well, the list goes on.

In Denver, the list of essential services promulgated by the mayor initially did not contain liquor stores and recreational marijuana shops (though that list did include medical marijuana dispensaries). Within hours of the release of the initial essential services list, after a strong public outcry, those businesses were reclassified as essential. Apparently, a large number of Denver residents believed that services provided by liquor stores and recreational marijuana shops were essential to their lives.

More recently, various religious groups are arguing with their respective governors that their religious services are also essential and therefore churches deserve to be opened sooner rather than later. The variability between the various states as to how each relaxes its own public access restrictions has likely contributed to these disagreements leading to several lawsuits. The Supreme Court just ruled against a California church in a case balancing religious liberty and public health. While public health concerns were indeed cited as the main issue, also at issue was the classification/determination of how essential was the service in question (i.e into what tier was the church service placed compared with other non-religious, non-essential services). In other words, how essential was the non-essential service?

Answers to the questions about the essence of a human being provide the basis for our bioethics. One’s worldview affects those answers. The open debate as to whether human essence transcends death should at least give us pause to reconsider the ranking in our list of essential services.

Trust and the Pandemic

One of the necessary requirements of a doctor-patient relationship is the establishment of trust in that relationship. A vulnerable patient presents to a physician who theoretically has the skill and knowledge necessary to help resolve the patient’s problem. Ultimately, the patient has to trust the information and treatment recommendations of his or her physician. Even in situations where the initial diagnosis turns out to be incorrect, it is the trust bond between the patient and physician that allows the two to proceed to other diagnostic and treatment options. If trust is lost, it is less likely the patient will have confidence in the information or treatment suggestions by that physician, often resulting in the patient looking elsewhere for treatment.

On a larger scale, the general population must trust the information and recommendations from their Public Health experts before they will be willing to follow treatment protocols, such as those presently in place for the COVID-19 pandemic. Loss of trust in those public health officials, for any reason, will not only lead the public to look for other sources of information and treatment options, it will also make them less likely to follow guidelines and restrictions currently in place, particularly if those guidelines and restrictions are viewed as inconvenient or harmful.

What does the public do when the usual trusted sources of information on the pandemic are shown to provide false information? Take for instance the recent CBS News story on long lines for testing at Cherry Health in Grand Rapids, MI. It turned out the long car lines awaiting virus testing at this particular testing facility were artificially exaggerated, with both the news network and the health system denying responsibility for the falsehood. Purposefully falsifying the data being shown to the public ostensibly being used to determine healthcare policy related to the pandemic does nothing to foster trust by the general population in either the health system or the news media.

What does the public do when two publicly acknowledged experts on the current pandemic claim the data that the CDC has provided them (and the public) are not only inaccurate but the two experts disagree as to whether the actual data represents an overestimation or underestimation of the problem? This link from the Philadelphia Inquirer quotes Dr Deborah Birx as saying “[t[here is nothing from the CDC that I can trust” in expressing her concern that the number of COVID-19 deaths reported by the CDC are inflated. The same article reports Dr Anthony Fauci expressing concern that the same CDC death toll represents an underestimation. It is no wonder that increasing friction is growing in multiple regions of the US as people struggle with the continued personal safety concerns regarding the virus and the growing economic disruption caused by our personal and public responses to the pandemic. Jerry Risser provided a thoughtful blog entry of the bioethical issues of this public health vs economics struggle (absent this present blog entry’s concern of data reliability)

A recent May 14th podcast from the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) provided some optimism in an interesting behind the scenes overview of how a respected medical journal like the NEJM determines how to provide reliable information on the current Pandemic. It is approximately 19 minutes of audio and is well worth review. While the NEJM is not perfect, they transparently discuss how they go about providing reliable, trustworthy medical information to the medical doctors on the front lines treating medical problems in general, and this pandemic in particular. They openly discuss several problems that NEJM has with the sheer magnitude of current data juxtaposed with the goal of getting information out to the public in a timely manner (8:15), the question of actual content selected for publication (complications vs clinical trials – 11:00), issues of best evidence (randomized trials vs how to treat the patient in front of the doctor right now- 12:10) and determining strategies to assist in opening up the economy (14:40). One gets the sense after listening to the podcast that smart people are truly trying to get the best data to the front-line people in public health in order to provide the best care possible and that is reassuring.

I suspect (trust?) that many other medical journals, public health authorities, federal, state and local government officials are working to do the same. One of my patients reminded me that even if that is not the case, Proverbs 3:5-6 is reassuring.

Bioethics and the Study of Health Care Economics

A recent Technology Review article by Peter Dizikes featured a review of the academic work of Dr. Amy Finkelstein, an MIT economics professor who arguably has changed the way we understand the economic impact of health insurance. Though not the primary focus of her work, her results have also led to a better understanding of health care itself. The article may be found HERE. Though a significant part of the article is biographical of Dr. Finkelstein’s academic career and is interesting in its own right, I want to focus on a couple of her findings for this blog entry.

The main study upon which the article focused was the result of an opportunity she identified in 2008 when the State of Oregon increased its enrollment in its Medicaid program by 10,000 people via a random lottery. This allowed her to compare the new enrollees health care access and behavior against a similar control group that had been randomly denied similar access. Some interesting new insights emerged. For instance, it was assumed that since the uninsured people routinely used the ER to access medical care, providing them Medicaid insurance would increase their access to routine care thus decreasing their use of ER care. What Dr. Finkelstein found was that the new Medicaid enrollees increased their visits to the ER and this increase remained elevated for at least 2 years compared with the control group. In fact, the new Medicaid group showed increased doctor visits overall, as well as increased prescription drug use and increased hospitalizations. Their out-of-pocket medical expenses and unpaid medical debt both decreased. And, while their physical health measures did not change appreciably, they reported increased good health and had less incidence of depression.

Additionally, the article summarized seven other interesting findings from Dr. Finkelstein’s body of work thus far. I will leave the reader to explore the whole article for these details. One result of a 2020 study that was particularly interesting to me as a physician was the current practice of so-called “hotspotting”, the practice of providing pro-active care to high-risk populations in an attempt to reduce the patient’s hospital readmissions. Dr. Finkelstein showed that hotspotting appears to have no significant benefit in reducing readmission rates of those patients. It is good to determine whether or not our medical protocols, which sound reasonable on their face and therefore appear justified, are in fact accomplishing their intended results, particularly since these programs require both additional time and financial resources.

The reason to highlight Dr. Finkelstein’s work in a bioethics blog is to reinforce the importance of using good data to make informed decisions in health care. Understanding the true effects of medical policies in health care access, insurance or provision is just as necessary as debating their bioethical challenges, as the former may make the latter debates either more fruitful or completely unnecessary.

Negative QALY Scores and Voluntary Euthanasia

I am all about saving money. I also enjoy reading the bioethical insights of Wesley Smith. His recent commentary in National Review entitled “Bioethicists: Euthanasia Will Save Money and Facilitate Organ Donations” naturally caught my eye. This blog has discussed the ethical problems with euthanasia and organ donation previously (see HERE and HERE). The focus of the remainder of this blog entry is to challenge the use of negative Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) as a utilitarian determinant of healthcare resource management, particularly with respect to voluntary euthanasia.

The article upon which Smith is commenting appeared in Clinical Ethics on March 10th by David Shaw and Alec Morton and was entitled “Counting the cost of denying assisted suicide” (full article behind firewall – abstract HERE). The authors briefly review the use of QALYs as used within the UK National Health System to determine cost/benefit of allocating medical resources. They explain the concept of negative QALYs, effectively time spent living (and suffering) in a state worse than death. They argue improvement occurs in the overall NHS net QALYs when there is reallocation of actual medical resources consumed “by patients who are denied assisted dying [and therefore experience negative QALYs]…instead be used to provide additional (positive) quality-adjusted life years for patients elsewhere in the healthcare system who wish to continue living and to improve their quality of life.” The argument essentially is that voluntary euthanasia prevents additional negative QALYs in the person requesting euthanasia and increases positive QALYs in one or more individuals in the population at large through the reallocation of the medical resources presently consumed by the person requesting euthanasia. Following the voluntary euthanasia and medical resource re-allocation, the NHS system is subsequently more efficient or economical since there are overall higher system QALYs given the same resources.

For this macabre exercise in utilitarian QALY mathematics to make sense, one has to grant that there is a state in life that is worse than death (by definition death is a QALY = zero). Individuals with terminal diseases and/or chronic pain stipulate their current state is indeed worse than death and therefore they experience a QALY less than zero – a negative QALY. They further believe they have no hope of ever achieving a state of positive QALY so argue their best option is voluntary euthanasia to reach death (so no more negative QALYs). Given all of this subjective stipulation, one might counter that other states of life might also exist that are also worse than death, such as the act of voluntary euthanasia. Perhaps it causes a transitional state of QALY much, much less than zero (something that “regular dying” does not)(since we are all just stipulating here) Any additional stipulations like this potentially further challenge their nice calculus.

Given the above, and perhaps more concerning, it is unclear (at least to this author) why Shaw and Morton used QALYs to score an act of voluntary euthanasia. It is unlikely that an individual goes through a similar calculus to determine whether his or her life is worth living with respect to the general population. He or she is deciding whether or not they want to continue living. They are not using a QALY score to justify their voluntary euthanasia decision to the population at large. So why the QALY score? Might such a calculus be used by one group to mathematically or scientifically justify imposing euthanasia upon another group, particularly within a system where medical resources are (becoming more) limited? Maybe it is just a way to suggest to those of us who find voluntary euthanasia morally wrong that it can’t be all that bad?

After all, it does save money.

Who gets the Ventilator?

Anyone watching the news coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic here in the US during the past week could not have avoided considering this generic question. Some are living in regions where the question is much more personalized – “If there really are not enough to go around, will I get a ventilator if I need one?” Ethically allocating a scarce resource such as a ventilator during a global pandemic caused by a virus that can strike anyone and potentially cause death by respiratory failure is clearly one of the great bioethical challenges facing us. What follows is a brief, blog length, discussion of some of the pertinent concerns followed by links to more detailed exploration, written by bioethicists who have considered these issues in greater detail.

In the last blog entry, Joy Riley touched on the issue of one individual refusing a ventilator for the expressed benefit of others. While the whole story was more complex, the facts do remind us that treatment (and therefore utilization of scarce resources) should start by determining what the patient actually wants and whether the resource in question can have any meaningful benefit in that patient’s care. Jon Holmund began the discussion of what processes and protocols may ethically change during the pandemic with resource scarcity and what others should remain in force.

My last entry touched on the four Principles of Bioethics (Autonomy, Justice, Beneficence and non-Maleficence) as a simple outline. The Principles are often referenced in guiding the one-to-one ethical relationship between the doctor and patient. Limited resource allocation affecting a population as a whole would seem to demand a different or additional ethical framework. Utilitarianism is often used in this context since it is an ethical system that desires to maximize some good (happiness, pleasure, health), theoretically scalable by maximizing that good for a whole population. Some problems with utilitarianism are determining exactly what that good should be as a population and agreeing on exactly how to measure it.

In the issue of the COVID-19 pandemic, one utility is maximizing access to ventilators or, perhaps more broadly, maximizing the number of lives saved. This sounds promising. But what happens when two people (or more) need, and want, the same ventilator at the same time. How do you determine who gets the ventilator? Utilitarianism does not necessarily answer this question or the many following: Is it “first come-first served”? Do we draw straws (a lottery)? Is it the person who can “pay the highest price”? The person who “needs it immediately”? The person who only needs it for a short time (so that the ventilator can be used again to help someone else)? Does the ventilator go to the person who is responsible for saving other lives (such as a nurse, food supplier, ventilator maker – and if so, how does one prioritize among these)? Assuming these decisions can initially be made, can we change that decision later? For instance, if someone has been using the ventilator for a (long) while, is it ever ethical to remove that person so that someone else “has a chance”? If not, is it ethical to somehow prevent them from being selected for ventilator access in the first place?

None of the preceding questions are easily answered, particularly in the heat of the moment, and are therefore best answered, if they can be, at the outset. Once determined, they should be made public as transparent guidelines. If agreeable to all involved, then applicable equally to all involved, and implemented fairly as specifically outlined. No guidelines will be exhaustively perfect in their ability to stratify and prioritize access to save the lives of all involved – the best that may be accomplished is to save the greatest number of lives until the scarcity of ventilators is resolved or the pandemic has run its course.

Agreeing on an ethically acceptable method to allocate scarce resources in a theoretical pandemic is very difficult, even in the abstract; actually implementing such a plan during the emergency of the real pandemic warrants nothing short of divine guidance.

For those interested in reading further and/or deeper, the Center for Bioethics and Human Dignity has an excellent resource page with multiple links to other references. I found Dr. John Kilner’s “Criteria for the Allocation of Limited Healthcare Resources” very helpful.

Bioethics and the COVID-19 National Emergency

What a difference a couple of days can make. In the last blog entry, Steve Phillips discussed the problems that fear and panic are causing as we deal the many unknowns of the COVID-19 pandemic. While the current incidence, prevalence, and mortality of COVID-19 lags behind that of seasonal influenza (as well as past influenza pandemics caused by novel influenza strains), the eventual morbidity and mortality remain unknown. This uncertainty has caused public panic, which has lead to significant disruption of life, as we know it. A national emergency was declared in the US last Friday, calming some fears but reinforcing others. Using the four Principles of Bioethics as a simple outline, the following are some of the bioethical implications of the current COVID-19 pandemic I have recently considered – there is certainly space to add others.

Autonomy: The highly infectious nature of the new virus and the risks for the population as a whole place severe restrictions on individual autonomy. An individual is really not free to do whatever he or she wishes to do at this time. Measures to blunt the rate of infection spread have limited travel and will eventually cause some to be quarantined, perhaps against their will. Necessary public health measures will conflict with individual health decisions and desires. Do all individuals have a right to be tested for COVID-19 (particularly now that the test will shortly be free of charge) because they have a right to know or demand to know, or will we defer to protocols of best practice in the face of currently limited test availability, all of which are admittedly our best statistical utilitarian “guesstimates” for the benefit of the population as a whole?

Justice: The details of the pending National Emergency legislation are still not well known as of this writing but will apparently provide financial support to individuals and businesses affected by COVID-19 and this is certainly good, given the considerable disruption already caused by the fear and panic related to the disease, and the projected future impact of the actual illness itself. It is interesting to me that one result of this legislation may be that, with accurate testing, an individual or business will get federal benefits for having COVID-19 related problems but may not for similar influenza related problems. This is despite the fact that from an individual morbidity and mortality standpoint, particularly on a global basis, both COVID-19 and influenza both can end up causing severe health and secondary financial consequences. Asked differently, does justice require federalizing other viruses (or diseases) that, on a case-by-case basis, cause similar individual financial disruption as we will see from COVID-19?

Beneficence: I believe most people want to be helpful to others and do the right thing. Any desire to help others is somewhat counter balanced by lack of knowledge of exactly how infectious is the COVID-19 and therefore what risks do we assume for ourselves and for our immediate family in any benevolent activity in which we engage. Deciding how to help others without harming oneself will become clearer as the public health data grows.

Non-maleficence: Our natural tendency for self-preservation in uncertain times has resulted in a rush to hoard food and supplies, causing a severe strain on supply of these resources. Supply chains in a global “just-in-time” inventory structure are much more fragile as a result of COVID-19 than many had anticipated. Important medications, medical supplies, standard foodstuffs and infant needs are suddenly in short supply and are concerning; recent news videos of fights at your local Cosco over the last role of toilet paper are concerning for other reasons. Calls have gone out asking citizens to “hoard less”; hopefully these pleas will not fall on deaf and selfish ears.

For the Christian, wisely loving our neighbors may be the best ethical guideline and will look different in various regions and will likely change over time as we get a better understanding of COVID-19. I echo the many prayers for the health and safety of all affected by this pandemic and an extra measure of the Lord’s wisdom and strength for those in public health rising to meet and resolve this national (and worldwide) emergency.

The Non-Binary Doctor-Patient Relationship

Today’s blog entry continues another aspect of what Neil Skjoldal began yesterday. Shoshana Rockoff, writing in Yeshiva University’s The Commentator wrote about the changing landscape of physician private practice ownership and how that may be changing the doctor-patient relationship for the worse. She reflects on her grandfather’s private optometry practice when she describes the solid personal relationships that developed with his patients over his some 30 years of private practice. She worries what the future of that doctor-patient relationship will look like as both hospital systems and private equity firms, looking to make a profit, swallow up a growing number of practices. Her editorial is found here.

My personal practice experience is not too dissimilar. I began in private practice 30 years ago as a rehabilitation physician taking care of mostly inpatients who had recently suffered a stroke, spinal cord or head injury. I saw outpatients in my daily clinic that had the chronic neuromusculoskeletal sequelae of these problems. The chronic nature of their diseases resulted in my getting to know my patients fairly well, an attribute that I very much enjoyed.

What I did not enjoy was negotiating my reimbursement rates with the insurance system, something I was never trained to do in residency. As a solo practitioner, I had no clout with the large insurance carriers and my rates went down every year. Eager to pay back my student loan debt, I had also accepted a stipend to be the rehabilitation hospital’s medical director, which was my first experience with conflict of interest – I was responsible for making sure that only medically appropriate patients were admitted to the hospital while working with the administration of the hospital to maintain its financial viability at a time when insurance companies were beginning to aggressively assert their financial ability to reduce costs. It is rare, if not impossible, to wear two conflicting hats well, particularly at the same time.

I eventually joined a larger, multispecialty (mainly orthopaedic surgery) physician-owned group practice, where I remain today. Being part of a larger group allows us to negotiate more favorable reimbursement rates than my earlier experience but now from the dwindling number of consolidating insurance companies, who, along with the federal government Medicare and Medicaid programs, dictate those rates. My reimbursement rate has still gone down every year, now at a slower rate. A solo practice or small group private practice has no similar negotiating power with the insurance system. This is, if not the main reason, at least a significant reason that many of my colleagues who were in small physician-owned practices have decided to be acquired by large hospital systems or sell a portion of their assets to equity firms, who naturally exert some influence on future medical business decisions.

Economic decisions have not been isolated to the doctor side of the equation. Individual patients and smaller businesses that provide insurance to their employees lack the negotiation power with these same insurance providers and, over time, have had to settle for insurance coverage that contractually pays for fewer benefits at gradually increasing cost to those same patients or small businesses. Only very large companies or unions have any negotiation power to obtain better insurance benefits at less cost. The recipients of government sponsored insurance programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, have the least direct costs but also the least direct say in their medical benefits, and these programs presently dictate medical reimbursement for well over one-third of the US population.

I think Ms. Rockoff is correct that it is getting harder to maintain the same doctor-patient relationship that her grandfather and his patients enjoyed decades ago. I think the primary reason is that both doctors and patients have allowed third parties into that relationship, largely for economic reasons, a process that began even before her grandfather started his practice.

I am blessed to be part of a physician-run multispecialty group that remains committed to a (Judeo-Christianized) Hippocratic doctor-patient relationship. I know many of my corporate-employed colleagues desire and work to maintain the same relationship with their patients. Many non-medical business people running corporate practices want that type of relationship with their physician.

The real question may be how to have a doctor-patient relationship when the relationship is no longer binary, and likely never will be again.

The Advancing Slippery Slope of Organ Donation and Euthanasia

The timing of organ donation relative to death of the donor is critical to the survivability and future functioning of the donated organs in the transplant recipient. With cardiovascular death, circulation ceases in the donor causing his or her death, making it legally and ethically permissible to retrieve the organs for donation. Unfortunately, cardiovascular death also means that the donated organs have also lost circulation at the moment of death and begin to suffer local tissue destruction, affecting the very health of the donor organs and success of transplantation. If the donor has sustained severe brain damage but without cardiovascular death, he or she may be considered dead secondary to whole brain death criteria. This allows transplant surgeons to begin harvesting the organs from the donor while the organs are still enjoying a normal oxygen supply, maximizing their survivability for the future transplant recipient. These organs are far more viable than those from donors who had cardiovascular death, similar to the situation of a healthy living organ donor voluntarily donating one of her two kidneys. Crudely, the less dead you are when you donate your organs, the better chance of success of the organ transplantation for the recipient. Knowing the exact moment when the donor dies maximizes the timing and therefore the success of the transplant process.

Enter euthanasia, in particular the growing acceptance of medical aid in dying (MAID) or physician assisted suicide (PAS), where a physician is directly controlling the dying process. The union of MAID/PAS and organ donation would seem to be a marriage made in transplant heaven. By controlling the time of death of the donor, the subsequent immediate harvesting of the donated organs would theoretically maximize their viability. What could be better?

Euthanasia via organ donation, of course.

The NEJM offered a recent Perspective entitled “Altruism in Extremis – The Evolving Ethics of Organ Donation” by Dr. Lisa Rosenbaum. The article is behind a subscription firewall that does offer limited free access with registration. In short, Dr. Rosenbaum explores many of these ethical issues in organ transplantation as she describes the case of a man who was dying of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease) and wanted to donate his organs in the process of his MAID/PAS (hence her title “Altruism in Extremis“). In his case, the plan was to donate one kidney, then be taken back to the intensive care unit and extubated, technically allowing the ALS respiratory muscle weakness to cause his death, and the remainder of his organs harvested immediately thereafter. The hospital ethics committee approved the plan but the hospital attorneys warned the doctors they might be “charged with murder or acceleration of the patient’s death” (facts not apparently obvious to the doctors). In the end, the patient died in hospice care, unable to donate his organs.

An interesting sidebar discussion of a similar case involving “live donation prior to planned withdrawal” (LD-PPW – that is, removing the organs before withdrawal of life support – what I have labelled Euthanasia via Organ Donation) was considered ethically permissible but politically problematic, the concern being LD-PPW might reduce the number of willing donors who saw the “surgeons as ‘vultures’ stealing organs from those not quite dead”.

What struck me was the obvious slippery slope on which we find ourselves. The question as to whether the patient in Dr. Rosenbaum’s article should proceed with MAID/PAS given his terminal ALS was NOT the ethical debate but rather how to ethically marry MAID/PAS (perhaps ideally with LD-PPW) with his desire for organ transplantation. Labeling this type of organ donation as obviously altruistic will undoubtedly place further pressure on some presently terminally-ill patients to get on with their deaths to make their organs available for the rest of us who apparently have an unspecified ethically superior claim to their use. Organ donation from a living donor is itself a supererogatory act – additionally encouraging the donor’s suicide (and labelling it altruistic) just to improve the success of the transplant is calling evil good. Why is one more minute of life-giving use of my heart or liver by me necessarily less ethical than 1 year of life-giving use of those organs in another?

P.S. Frankly, I thought the vulture metaphor failed as even vultures normally wait for their prey to be dead before enjoying their harvest.