Can we hop the gene-editing train?

As Joy Riley pointed out on this blog on December 7, the world and the scientific community recently marked, with almost no fanfare, the one-year birthday of “Lulu” and “Nana,” the first (we think) and still only (we think) humans to have had their genes edited heritably—in a way that will be passed on to future generations.  Joy commented these children are “experimental subjects for life,” or, to use the phrase I found and discussed some time ago on this blog, “the babies are the experiment.”  To wit: it is not possible fully to assess and limit the risks of heritable genome editing before actually editing humans.  One must forge ahead.  Even if one were to edit a series of embryos, and abort them at different times during gestation to get a full assessment of their prenatal development, the questions about lifelong effects and effects on future generations would persist. 

And, as mentioned in other posts on this blog earlier this year, there is the issue of “nonphysical” harms to how we understand ourselves and our human existence.

A number of world scientific bodies are assessing, independently of each other, what regulatory safeguards should be instituted, on the assumption that heritable genome editing is something that should be pursued.  Last month, the journal Nature editorialized that efforts by the World Health Organization, US and UK scientific bodies, and a third international commission should not proceed separately (they are all due to report their findings in 2020), but should work together.  The editors apparently think that it would be straightforward, obvious, and right to adopt a moratorium on clinical applications of heritable genome editing, establish an enforced registry for all experimentation in this area, and expand the conversations to include representatives of people with disabilities.  If I read that correctly, it’s hard to disagree.

In the laboratory, things are moving fast and it is well-nigh impossible to keep up with the science or the conversations about it without that work being one’s main occupation.  A recent contribution linked by the Nature editors is called “prime editing” that appears to increase substantially the efficiency of gene editing, raising the prospect of correcting abnormalities associated with the vast majority of genetic diseases.  The relatively naïve, like your present correspondent, might wonder whether this approach could be limited to already-born people with genetic diseases, as treatment, rather than engineer the genomes of the unborn in an apparent attempt to eliminate these abnormalities from the human prospect.

Even thinking about the general public trying to influence where this work leads feels like assuming the role of an old-style hobo, trying to hitch a free ride by jumping onto a moving freight train.  One is liable to fall under the wheels.  But in the case of heritable genome editing, you’re likely to get run over anyway.

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