The Old Guard

In an effort to disconnect from the craziness of life, I recently watched “The Old Guard,” a popular 2020 Netflix movie.  [Note:  spoiler alerts ahead.]  It tells the story of four “immortals,” led by Andromache of Scythia (also known as “Andy,” portrayed by Charlize Theron), and the ups and downs of their existence.  

As we are introduced to each of the immortals, we find that they were born in different centuries and have been alive for a very long time.  The bulk of their time seems to be participating in battles that have taken place throughout history  (e.g., The Crusades, the Napoleonic era, etc.).  It’s not clear from the movie that they were always immortal, but each one finds out quickly after sustaining a deadly wound and suddenly come back to life.  A fifth immortal, Marine officer Nile Freeman (portrayed by KiKi Layne) is introduced in a graphic scene where her neck is violently slashed and she is basically dead, but remarkably, she heals without explanation and without scars.  Within a few scenes, Andy takes Nile taken from her military camp and has introduced her to the team of immortals.

Obviously, there are some big questions here that we hear the immortals ask throughout the movie:  “Why me, why am I immortal and others are not?”  Or, “What are we supposed to be doing with this ‘immortality’?”   “Are we making any difference in a world that seems like it is getting worse instead of better?”  By the end of the story, the viewer gets an idea about the difference that the immortals have made throughout the years, but the “why” question remains unanswered.  Andy is a confirmed atheist and views Nile’s faith in God as illogical.  

More ethical issues arise when Big Pharma gets involved.   The villain of the movie, Steven Merrick (portrayed by Harry Melling) is the young Zuckerberg-esque head of his own pharmaceutical company.  He enlists help from a former CIA agent, James Copley (portrayed by Chiwetel Ejiofor) to capture the immortals and to run a series of endless tests on them.  As you might expect, the immortals are eventually captured and meet Merrick face to face.  He informs them that it is their duty to submit to his torturous experimentation because in the long run, they will help humanity.  He goes so far as to tell the heroes that it is ethical duty to do this because they could help so many people.

Copley’s ruthlessness clearly tells the viewer that his ethics are problematic.  He is not simply an altruistic scientist, he is an entrepreneur who wants to ensure that the immortals do not fall into the hands of his Big Pharma competitors.  His words about helping humanity ring hollow because of his overall devotion to the bottom line.  Or as he was told at the end of the movie, “It was not your choice to make.”

“The Old Guard” is a cautionary tale cloaked in the garb of a twenty-first century Netflix feature with all the special effects one might hope for.  Humanity never seems to learn their lesson; technology always seems to have a leg up on ethics.  In our fast-paced world, a cautionary tale may be just the thing we need.

Jeffrey Epstein & Transhumanism

In November 2018, journalist Julie Brown of the Miami Herald published an important three-part report called “Perversion of Justice,” describing the case of billionaire Jeffrey Epstein.  Brown’s reporting strongly indicates that Epstein’s punishment appeared relatively small when compared to the crimes that were actually committed.  The report, in part, led to further examination of the case and a recent indictment by the Southern District of New York.  Eventually the Secretary of Labor, Alex Acosta, resigned his cabinet position over questions about his role as a prosecutor in the case a decade earlier.

If the account of the crimes isn’t horrific enough, the New York Times reported last week that Epstein used his wealth to speak to prominent scientists about his goal to spread his DNA world-wide through impregnating groups of women at his New Mexico ranch.  In what reads like a creepy sci-fi novel, the articlereports: “Mr. Epstein’s vision reflected his longstanding fascination with what has become known as transhumanism: the science of improving the human population through technologies like genetic engineering and artificial intelligence.  Critics have likened transhumanism to a modern-day version of eugenics, the discredited field of improving the human race through controlled breeding.”

Epstein used his wealth and influence to ingratiate himself to the scientific community, according to the Times.  Prominent attorney Alan Dershowitz is quoted in the article: “Everyone speculated about whether these scientists were more interested in his views or more interested in his money.” Not surprisingly, several of the scientists contacted by the Times had a less than positive view of Epstein’s scientific musings.

One of the appeals of transhumanism is its goal to make humanity better through technology.  Living easily past 100 without all of the ailments of old age seems like a worthy goal. However, as is often the case, technology runs ahead of morality.  In Jeffrey Epstein’s case, it contradicts our understanding of basic human rights to think that the future belongs solely to amoral billionaires and the scientists they enlist in their causes.

Cyber Life After Death

In The New Yorker this week Laura Parker reports on a new internet start-up that has a technological solution to a vexing old problem: mortality. Eterni.me has the tagline in huge font on its site, “Simply Become Immortal.” The CEO, Marius Ursache, says he is trying to solve the “incredibly challenging problem of humanity.”

Transhumanists like Ray Kurzweil have been arguing for a while now that it is our unique arrangement of information that makes us human—not anything to do with flesh, or emotions, or spirit, per se. Therefore if you capture those data sets and upload them, then “you” could “live” forever. The Transhumanists are more hopeful that artificial intelligence would allow the sine qua non of sentience to emerge from the machines into which our data becomes hard-wired. This Eterni.me website really only strives to maintain your “digital footprints” and through a scanned 3D avatar present a facsimile of you to those whom you choose. For example, Facebook posts, timelines, Twitter feeds , Instagram posts, and emails are all collated, and then they are “taught” to interact with your loved ones after you pass on. Not quite as nefarious a project as the Transhumanists have in mind. Think of the hologram of Princess Leia popping out of R2D2 in Star Wars, “Help us Obi-Wan Kenobi, you are our only hope.” An image with historical content meant to remind those you left behind of your absence.

This is clearly the next logical step as more and more of our relationships are limited to a virtual realm, and authentic face-to-face encounters are becoming almost quaint. Theologically, this is just a further expression of St. Augustine’s homo incurvatus in se, or humankind’s turning in toward itself rather than looking to God for salvation. It’s a classic expression for our times: a technological solution trading on our narcissistic concern that we all die and will be forgotten, utilizing our curated and projected “self-image” as portrayed online, and sent to haunt those whom we choose. While it is a little bit creepy, it is more of a barometer for the state of human affairs as we continue the secular search for meaning beyond death.