Bioethics @ TIU

Inherent Problems with Commercial Surrogacy in India

Posted June 18th, 2017 by Philip Thompson

The degree to which financial incentives can muddle ethical deliberation and practice is evident in the commercial surrogacy trade in Indian. For years, “rent-a-womb” services to foreigners has been “big business” indeed, generating nearly $1 billion annually. Would-be Western parents, many from the U.K. and Scandinavia, argue that commercial surrogacy arrangements are a win-win situation for everyone. They get the baby they’ve longed for and… // Read More »

All We Need is (Unconditional) Love

Posted April 26th, 2017 by Chris Ralston

On March 24, 2017, Joe Gibes posted an entry on this blog, entitled “A ‘disabled’ person speaks out against a particular form of discrimination.”[1] That post featured links to several stories about Kathleen Humberstone, a young woman with Down Syndrome who spoke at a recent UN event commemorating World Down Syndrome Day, which was observed on March 21. After reading through Joe’s post and the… // Read More »

Surrogacy in the Market of Desire

Posted April 2nd, 2017 by D. Joy Riley

The State of Florida has spilled no small quantity of ink outlining the legal confines of gestational surrogacy (see particularly sections 742.13-742.17, here).  Legally permitted gestational surrogacy in Florida does not include “bringing in and harboring aliens, sex trafficking of children, forced labor and furthering slave traffic,” however; these charges were leveled against Esthela Clark in 2015. Clark had held a Mexican woman in her… // Read More »

The Gift of Finitude

Posted March 1st, 2017 by Chris Ralston

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about finitude. About limits. Incompleteness. Even failure. Like the friend of a friend who is dying and has just been admitted to hospice, whose young teenaged daughter is facing the prospect of a life without her mother. Like the colleague who is grieving the loss of both a spouse and a parent within a month of each other. Like… // Read More »

Testing, testing: Prenatal genetic screening

Posted June 10th, 2016 by Joe Gibes

The June 2016 issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology includes a study of the conversations between patients and “Health Care Providers” about prenatal genetic screening (PGS). The objective of the study was to “assess how obstetric health care providers counsel patients regarding prenatal genetic screening and how these conversations influence patients’ screening decisions.” PGS refers to blood and ultrasound tests performed early in pregnancy to determine… // Read More »

Oh, Those Darned Terms!

Posted September 14th, 2015 by Tom Garigan

In a recent post Jon Holmlund cited Thomas B. Edsall’s op-ed in the New York Times, “The Republican Conception of Conception.” Edsall was referring to the concept that life begins at conception. It is his hope that Republicans either stake a consistent position regarding the morality of post-conception “contraception” and incur the disfavor of the electorate, or abandon their “moral purity” in favor of “pragmatism” and… // Read More »

A Not-So-Open Discussion

Posted April 13th, 2015 by Tom Garigan

Courtney Thiele posted on March 3oth about an article in the Washington Post describing “a new push to de-stigmatize the nation’s most controversial medical procedure by talking about it openly and unapologetically.” A clinic in Maryland called “Carafem” dispenses abortion pills, and “promises a ‘spa-like’ experience for women with an open and unabashed approach to pregnancy termination.” (quotations from the Washington Post’s article) This clinic… // Read More »

Metaphor: Shopping

Posted October 17th, 2014 by Joe Gibes

Story: a white couple ordered sperm from a sperm bank, stipulating that it be from a white man, for artificial insemination; however, in the delivery room, it was immediately apparent that they didn’t get what they ordered, as their newborn daughter was mixed-race. The couple is now suing the sperm bank for $50,000. In Tuesday’s Chicago Tribune, columnist Dahleen Glanton wrote a commentary on this… // Read More »

PGD, BRCA, and the difference between Diseases and Risk Factors: “The lamps are going out . . .”

Posted February 21st, 2014 by Joe Gibes

It is currently estimated that up to 65% of women with the BRCA gene mutation will develop breast cancer. Monday’s Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reported on the growing number of women with the BRCA gene mutation who are undergoing in-vitro fertilization, having the resultant embryos tested for the presence of the mutation via preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), and choosing to implant only those free of… // Read More »

PGD and lives not worth living

Posted February 5th, 2014 by Steve Phillips

A colleague just e-mailed me about an article in Monday’s New York Times titled “Ethics Questions Arise as Genetic Testing of Embryos Increases”. The article focused on the decision of Amanda Kalinsky and her husband to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to have unaffected children after a genetic test at age 26 showed that she had the gene for Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease, a rare form of… // Read More »