Of IOM, IT, EMRs, patient safety, and quality

 

If your doctor’s not looking you in the eye quite as much as he or she used to, it may be partially the fault of the Institute of Medicine (IOM).

In 1999, the IOM published a report entitled “To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System,” which famously concluded that preventable medical errors cause up to 98,000 patient deaths annually. This was followed by the 2001 report, “Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century.” These reports touted, among other things, the power of health information technology (IT), including Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), to reduce medical errors, increase patient safety, and increase the quality of medical care. Subsequently, the federal government has stepped in, providing financial incentives for physicians who can demonstrate “meaningful use” of an EMR, and will soon be imposing financial penalties on those physicians who don’t climb onto the EMR bandwagon. Thus, the IOM is directly or indirectly responsible if your doctor isn’t looking you in the eye because she’s gazing into a computer screen instead.

Upon what evidence did the IOM base its assertion that EMR’s would improve safety and quality? Well … you know … it’s just kinda obvious, isn’t it? I mean, after all, it’s technology, and it’s gotta be better than paper, and it just makes sense that using more technology is better, right?

In fact, there was no data to suggest that health IT would improve either the quality or the safety of medical care. In the intervening years, as health IT implementation has exploded, there continues to be a paucity of data to suggest that health IT improves either the quality or the safety of medical care. There is good data that it introduces new errors and quality problems into health care.

Last month the IOM released a new report, calling for the formation of an independent federal body to investigate patient deaths and other adverse events caused by … drumroll, please … health information technology.

Dr. Richard I. Cook, an associate professor of anesthesia and critical care at the University of Chicago, said, “It’s not surprising that such adverse events are being found related to health IT, and it’s not surprising that those promoting these systems have neither looked for them nor anticipated them. To make large-scale investments in these systems and only now be looking at the impact on patient safety borders on recklessness.” Dr. Scot M. Silverstein, a consultant in medical informatics at the Drexel University College of Information Science and Technology in Pennsylvania, said that it is “unethical” to expand health IT so dramatically without understanding the precise nature of the risks it poses to patients.

“Reckless” … “unethical” …

Meanwhile, my doctor’s still not looking me in the eye because he’s trying to find something in the computer. Sheesh! This is quality improvement?? Have we simply created a new “Quality chasm”?

 

(The quotes above are from this story which was published in the AMA news.)

Cover-ups

Recently I have been reading the account of David’s life in first and second Samuel. Although he had a close relationship with God, David had his ethical failings. Much of his problems started with his adultery with Bathsheba which he tried to cover up when she became pregnant. His first cover-up attempt failed when he called her husband Uriah back from battle, but he refused to spend the night with his wife while his companions were at war. Next he tried to cover it up by having Uriah killed and taking Bathsheba as his wife. The consequences in David’s life and in his family were devastating.

Cover-ups have been a part of the fallen human response to errors and wrongdoing from the garden of Eden to Watergate.

One of the common ethical issues in medicine is how to deal with medical errors. For most of us our first response is to cover it up. Explaining to a patient that an error was made that has had or could have a bad effect is not an easy thing to do, but reading about David reminds us how bad a cover-up can be.