2020, or 20/20?

Near the end of 2018, He Jiankui was on the world’s stage announcing that he had edited the genome of twin girls, in the hope of making them resistant to HIV. On Tuesday, December 31, 2019, the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) printed a report that Dr. He and two others have been convicted of “illegally practicing medicine related to carrying out human-embryo gene-editing intended for reproduction.” (online version here).

A court in Shenzhen concluded that the defendants had acted for “fame and profit,” when they “deliberately violated the relevant national regulations, and crossed the bottom lines of scientific and medical ethics.” For the crime committed, He received the most severe sentence. In addition to the three-year prison sentence, He is banned for life from “working in the field of reproductive life sciences and from applying for related research grants, “ according to the WSJ.

The Xinhua News Agency also noted that a third genome-edited baby had been born, and that this child, along with the previously born twins, “would be monitored by government health departments.” The WSJ did not state for how long the monitoring would continue. Not only were the children experimental subjects as embryos, but they continue to be subjects as well. Further, these genome effects will affect their progeny, potentially into perpetuity. Additionally, the Smithsonian Magazine reports that in the summer of 2019, He met with “investors to discuss a potential commercial genetic modification clinic in Hainan, which aims to become a ‘world-class medical tourism hub’.”  One might reasonably call this “a crime against humanity,” even if it does not include genocide of humans already born. (For further reading, see David Luban, “A Theory of Crimes Against Humanity”)

In the print edition of the WSJ, alongside the article on He is an article about Pastor Wang Yi of the Early Rain Covenant Church. Pastor Wang was sentenced on 30 December to nine years in prison. His crime was “incitement of subversion of state power and illegal business operations” (online article here).

Consider that a pastor receives a nine-year sentence for an offense against the State; and a scientist, a sentence of three years for a crime against multiple generations, and indeed, humanity. In the year 2020, we could use a check of our understanding of what is important in the life of the world. Would that our vision were 20/20 also.

Experimental Subjects for Life?

More than a year after the birth announcement of genome-edited babies in China, we are only slightly more informed of He Jiankui’s experimentation, the results of which are named “Lulu” and “Nana.” Although apparently approached, neither Nature nor the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) chose to publish He’s work. Antonio Regalado reported on an unpublished manuscript in “China’s CRISPR babies: Read exclusive excerpts from the unseen original research” in Technology Review on 3 December 2019. The Technology Review article includes not only excerpts of the manuscript from He, but also reactions from Stanford law professor Hank Greely; University of California—Berkeley’s gene-editing scientist Fyodor Urnov; the scientific director of Eugin assisted reproduction clinics, Rita Vassena; and reproductive endocrinologist Jeanne O’Brien, from Shady Grove Fertility.

Regalado summarizes some of the problems with Chinese experiment as follows:

 . . . key claims that He and his team made are not supported by the data; the      babies’ parents may have been under pressure to agree to join the experiment; the supposed medical benefits are dubious at best; and the researchers moved forward with creating living human beings before they fully understood the effects of the edits they had made.

Greely points out the lack of “independent evidence” of the claims made in the paper. Urnov labels the paper’s claim of reproducing the usual CCR5 variant “a deliberate falsehood,” and calls the statement about the possibility of millions being helped through embryo editing “equal parts delusional and outrageous.” O’Brien’s concerns include the possibility of coercion of the couples involved, and, noting the social stigma of HIV-positivity in China, she poses the question of whether this was a genetic fix for a social problem. Certainly, the Chinese experiment raises many questions, including how a culture views children. Are children gifts to be received or projects to be completed? Is it appropriate to subject children to experimental research because we can? One of the quotes from the paper reads, “we have made a follow-on plan to monitor the health of the twins for 18 years and hope to then reconsent for continued monitoring through adulthood.”

We would be remiss if we thought that China alone plans to remake humanity. Vassena is quoted regarding He’s study:

Unfortunately, it reads more like an experiment in search of a purpose, an    attempt to find a defensible reason to use CRISPR/Cas9 technology in human embryos at all costs, rather than a conscientious, carefully thought through, stepwise approach to editing the human genome for generations to come.  As the current scientific consensus indicates, the use of CRISPR/Cas9 in human embryos destined to give rise to a pregnancy is, at this stage, unjustified and unnecessary, and should not be pursued.

Vassena, who directs a fertility enterprise, it should be noted, appears comfortable with impacting the human genome for generations to come:  It just needs to be a “reflective” and “mindful” approach. That is chilling. Would she, or the study’s authors, or Greely, or Urnov, or O’Brien sign up to be a science experiment for the rest of their lives? I would not consent—not for myself nor for my children—no matter how “reflective” or “mindful” the researcher happened to be.

Finally, “Lulu” and “Nana” should be known as more than the results of someone’s laboratory experiment. They are human beings, not laboratory rats or cells under a microscope to be studied at the will and convenience of the experimenters.