The Advancing Slippery Slope of Organ Donation and Euthanasia

The timing of organ donation relative to death of the donor is critical to the survivability and future functioning of the donated organs in the transplant recipient. With cardiovascular death, circulation ceases in the donor causing his or her death, making it legally and ethically permissible to retrieve the organs for donation. Unfortunately, cardiovascular death also means that the donated organs have also lost circulation at the moment of death and begin to suffer local tissue destruction, affecting the very health of the donor organs and success of transplantation. If the donor has sustained severe brain damage but without cardiovascular death, he or she may be considered dead secondary to whole brain death criteria. This allows transplant surgeons to begin harvesting the organs from the donor while the organs are still enjoying a normal oxygen supply, maximizing their survivability for the future transplant recipient. These organs are far more viable than those from donors who had cardiovascular death, similar to the situation of a healthy living organ donor voluntarily donating one of her two kidneys. Crudely, the less dead you are when you donate your organs, the better chance of success of the organ transplantation for the recipient. Knowing the exact moment when the donor dies maximizes the timing and therefore the success of the transplant process.

Enter euthanasia, in particular the growing acceptance of medical aid in dying (MAID) or physician assisted suicide (PAS), where a physician is directly controlling the dying process. The union of MAID/PAS and organ donation would seem to be a marriage made in transplant heaven. By controlling the time of death of the donor, the subsequent immediate harvesting of the donated organs would theoretically maximize their viability. What could be better?

Euthanasia via organ donation, of course.

The NEJM offered a recent Perspective entitled “Altruism in Extremis – The Evolving Ethics of Organ Donation” by Dr. Lisa Rosenbaum. The article is behind a subscription firewall that does offer limited free access with registration. In short, Dr. Rosenbaum explores many of these ethical issues in organ transplantation as she describes the case of a man who was dying of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease) and wanted to donate his organs in the process of his MAID/PAS (hence her title “Altruism in Extremis“). In his case, the plan was to donate one kidney, then be taken back to the intensive care unit and extubated, technically allowing the ALS respiratory muscle weakness to cause his death, and the remainder of his organs harvested immediately thereafter. The hospital ethics committee approved the plan but the hospital attorneys warned the doctors they might be “charged with murder or acceleration of the patient’s death” (facts not apparently obvious to the doctors). In the end, the patient died in hospice care, unable to donate his organs.

An interesting sidebar discussion of a similar case involving “live donation prior to planned withdrawal” (LD-PPW – that is, removing the organs before withdrawal of life support – what I have labelled Euthanasia via Organ Donation) was considered ethically permissible but politically problematic, the concern being LD-PPW might reduce the number of willing donors who saw the “surgeons as ‘vultures’ stealing organs from those not quite dead”.

What struck me was the obvious slippery slope on which we find ourselves. The question as to whether the patient in Dr. Rosenbaum’s article should proceed with MAID/PAS given his terminal ALS was NOT the ethical debate but rather how to ethically marry MAID/PAS (perhaps ideally with LD-PPW) with his desire for organ transplantation. Labeling this type of organ donation as obviously altruistic will undoubtedly place further pressure on some presently terminally-ill patients to get on with their deaths to make their organs available for the rest of us who apparently have an unspecified ethically superior claim to their use. Organ donation from a living donor is itself a supererogatory act – additionally encouraging the donor’s suicide (and labelling it altruistic) just to improve the success of the transplant is calling evil good. Why is one more minute of life-giving use of my heart or liver by me necessarily less ethical than 1 year of life-giving use of those organs in another?

P.S. Frankly, I thought the vulture metaphor failed as even vultures normally wait for their prey to be dead before enjoying their harvest.

Getting the Best Possible Organs for the Rest of Us

By Mark McQuain

A recent September 6th Perspective in the NEJM entitled “Voluntary Euthanasia – Implications for Organ Donation” teases with the following lead-in:“Canada now permits physicians to hasten the death of a patient by means of physician-assisted suicide or voluntary euthanasia. This development creates a new pathway for organ donation – and with it, some challenges.” Kudos to the NEJM marketing department for luring me into finally buying a full subscription. I’ll summarize some key points for those without a subscription.

The article begins by summarizing some differences between the comatose patient receiving end-of-life care in a standard ICU environment and the situation of individual intending voluntary euthanasia in a hospital. Healthcare teams may rely on surrogate decision making in the first instance but require first person consent in the euthanasia instance. Also, use of sedatives and analgesics in traditional end of life care are guided by the doctrine of double effect (intending comfort but not death) whereas physicians are not legally required to titrate those same medications in the instance of voluntary euthanasia (where euthanasia is legal). These issues are effectively the non-controversial portion of the article.

The heart of the article dealt with what one ought to do in the situation of a patient who wants to donate his or her organs “in the best condition possible” while receiving voluntary euthanasia. This would involve “procuring the patient’s organs in the same way that organs are procured from brain-dead patients (with the use of general anesthesia to ensure the patient’s comfort).”

The problem is that these patients aren’t brain dead yet. The authors are frustrated that awaiting brain death, even in voluntary euthanasia, results in sub-optimal quality of the donor organs. Harvesting organs from voluntarily euthanized patients before they are brain-dead “would require an amendment to the Criminal Code of Canada, which defines medical assistance in dying as the administration of a ‘substance’ by a qualified provider. By this definition, organ retrieval is not an accepted cause of death.” (N.B.- Though it most certainly is the cause of death!)

For those unable to retrieve the NEJM article, I offer a similar article by Dominic Wilkinson and Julian Savulescu supporting the same ethical argument (that it is OK to cause the death of an individual by harvesting their organs if they wished voluntary euthanasia). They summarize Dr. Robert Truog’s bioethical position (one of the authors of the present NEJM article) in footnote 66 as follows:

“Truog’s justification for ODE [Organ Donation Euthanasia] is different from that presented here [in our paper]. He argues that current concepts of brain death and the dead-donor rule are incoherent, and he proposes an alternative based upon the principles of autonomy and non-maleficence. We find Truog’s arguments compelling. Our paper can be seen as providing a complementary argument in favour of ODE. Truog favours a narrow definition for the group of patients who may consent to this procedure: only those who will die within minutes of withdrawal of life support, or who are permanently unconscious. Our definition of LSW [Life Support Withdrawal] donors overlaps with Truog’s, but includes the larger group of patients from whom it is permissible to withdraw life support in intensive care, and whose death is highly likely to ensue (though not necessarily instantly).”

To be blunt, what both groups are arguing is that it should be OK to surgically remove organs from an individual who is not brain dead though has already consented to voluntary euthanasia, knowing that the surgical removal of the organs will cause the immediate death of the individual. The priority of marrying euthanasia and organ donation is obtaining the best possible organs for the rest of us.

As a counter argument, I again turn to Wesley Smith for his thoughts in a recent National Review article similarly entitled “Canada Conjoining Euthanasia/Organ Donation”. It is short and to the point.

I must concur with Wesley Smith: The slippery slope of euthanasia is getting more slippery. How long before we grease those skids further by paying for the organs so harvested?

Belgian Euthanasia: Volunteers No Longer Necessary?

A recent resignation letter by one member of Belgium’s Euthanasia Commission suggests the slippery slope of who meets the criteria for legal euthanasia is becoming even more slippery. Dr. Ledo Vanopdenbosch sent his resignation letter to members of the Belgian Parliament who oversee the commission. His concern was with one of the main requirements of the law, which demands that the individual patient formally request euthanasia. Vanopdenbosch claims euthanasia occurred on a psychiatric patient without his or her request. His resignation has generated substantial concern not only because Vanopdenbosch is a committee member but also because he is considered a strong advocate of euthanasia. Here is the AP article in Voice of America with the details.

One of the main tasks of the Belgium Euthanasia Commission is to review every euthanasia case to make sure each case meets the legal criteria necessary for euthanasia. Any case in doubt is referred to the public prosecutor’s office. It is perhaps telling that in the last 15 years since legalization of euthanasia in Belgium, over 10,000 individuals have been euthanized but only one case has been referred to prosecutors by the commission with the concern that it may have been performed illegally. Vanopdenbosch argues that the commission is acting in place of the courts, a potential conflict of interest given that those on the commission are generally considered strong supporters of euthanasia. In addition to the slippery slope metaphor used earlier, one might also add that the foxes are guarding the henhouse.

An internal review of this particular case resulted in the committee claiming that what really happened was an accidental death related to palliative care rather than actual involuntary or non-voluntary euthanasia, as is claimed by Vanopdenbosch. The general population will never know, as commission protocol and privacy concerns prevent the details of the case from ever reaching the light of day. In absence of further details, one wonders whether the alleged palliative care for the unknown psychiatric condition was formally requested by an otherwise competent patient or just provided absent his or her formal consent but “in his or her best interest” by the patient’s physician or caregivers.

It is presently unknown whether or not Dr. Vanopdenbosch’s resignation will result in any changes in the structure, function or transparancy of Belgium’s Euthanasia Committee. At the very least, one would expect to see an increase in referrals to the public prosecutor’s office for legal oversight. It is simply unbelievable that the committee has only encountered one case out of 10,000 cases that they found sufficiently suspect to refer to prosecutors for legal review. Perhaps more importantly, I want to believe that even those supporting euthanasia would be against all forms of non-voluntary euthanasia, particularly involuntary euthanasia. Sadly, I am naive. In our post-modern world, how can any death be a “good death” unless, at the very least, the competent patient in question so stipulates?

(For an excellent recent YouTube interview containing a brief history of euthanasia, please see this link of an interview with Dr. Richard Weikart, Professor of History at California State University, Stanislaus. Some highlights: at 10:40 where he touches on Belgium and psychiatric euthanasia, at 19:00 where he discusses the slippery slope argument, and at 21:30 regarding non-voluntary euthanasia)

How Slippery the Slope?

Proponents of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and voluntary active euthanasia (VAE) tend to dismiss slippery slope arguments against their position as needless and unnecessary alarms. Ongoing events and discussions in Canada, however, suggest that the slope of assisted dying may indeed be slippery and the alarms justified.

In February 2015 the Supreme Court of Canada found that the existing ban on physician-assisted dying (PAD) violated the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The Court initially gave the federal/provincial/territorial governments one year to pass new legislation, but later extended the deadline. As a result, PAD will be legal in Canada by June 6, 2016. Currently, the various levels of government are hammering out the details of the regulatory framework for assisted dying with the assistance of an advisory panel on PAD. Though the June deadline is still months away and the work of the advisory panel is not yet complete, some of the panel’s recommendations that are coming to light are troubling.

First, the panel maintains that “physician-assisted dying” (PAD) should encompass both PAS (the physician prescribes a lethal medication) and VAE (the physician injects a lethal medication) and should be publicly funded. The panel sees no ethically/medically significant difference between the two acts and recommends that both be permissible. Thus, Canada, from the beginning, would join the ranks of the Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxembourg in legalizing VAE. In contrast, PAS is legal in six states in the U.S. but VAE is still illegal in all fifty states.

Second, eligibility for PAD should be based on “competence” rather than “age,” theoretically removing age limits altogether. Co-chair Jennifer Gipson remarks, “Some children, especially adolescents, have the competence and the capacity to make end of life decision. What it turns on is not their age, not what their birth certificate says, but it’s really their ability to appreciate their diagnosis, their options.” While some members of the panel balk at the notion of a “competent” five or seven year old, none seem to have problems with a “competent” twelve year old, which seems to be the lower limit on which the panel has settled. Thus, from the start, Canada would be in line with the Netherlands where VAE is legal for children over the age of twelve, and potentially with Belgium that allows VAE for children without any age limit, developments that did not occur until 2014 after years of practicing more restricted VAE. In what other context does “competent adult” include children 12 years old and younger?

Third, patients requesting PAD need not be “terminal.” To have access to PAD, the Supreme Court declared that patients must have a “grievous and irremediable” condition. The advisory panel interprets this language to mean “a very severe or serious illness, disease, or disability that cannot be alleviated by any means acceptable to the patient.” The patient need not have a terminal condition. One wonders if mental conditions are included in this comprehensive redefinition.

These are not the only troubling recommendations of the committee. Another, for example, is that the “P” in PAD is not limited to physicians, but would also include a registered nurse or other health care professionals. But these are sufficient to sound the alarm. Eligibility requirements for euthanasia continue to be relaxed. Canada proposes to begin from a “relaxed” position. From PAS to VAE, from the limit of legal adult to no age limit at all, from terminal illness to any condition that makes life not worth living to the patient. Where will fixation on death end, and limits on human autonomy begin? To this writer, the slope seems as slippery as a downhill ski course!

Sources: http://eol.law.dal.ca/?page_id=238; http://www.bioedge.org/bioethics/hammering-out-the-details-in-canadas-new-euthanasia-regime/11700#sthash.zfkfJw6j.dpuf