Bioethics @ TIU

All We Need is (Unconditional) Love

Posted April 26th, 2017 by Chris Ralston

On March 24, 2017, Joe Gibes posted an entry on this blog, entitled “A ‘disabled’ person speaks out against a particular form of discrimination.”[1] That post featured links to several stories about Kathleen Humberstone, a young woman with Down Syndrome who spoke at a recent UN event commemorating World Down Syndrome Day, which was observed on March 21. After reading through Joe’s post and the… // Read More »

Which is It? “Tissue” or “Baby”?

Posted April 2nd, 2017 by Philip Thompson

I’m not a physician. I know next to nothing about biology or embryology. I’m confused. Will those who are trained in medical sciences please help me to understand? In January 2017, Arkansas governor Asa Hutchinson signed into law Bill 1032 which prohibits a procedure, “dilation and evacuation” (D&E), that is used in a large percentage of abortions after the 14-week mark. Critics complain that making… // Read More »

A “disabled” person speaks out against a particular form of discrimination

Posted March 24th, 2017 by Joe Gibes

Amidst lots of dark and tragic stories, a bright ray on the BBC website this week: Kathleen Humberstone, a 17 year-old English girl with Down syndrome, addressed the UN in Geneva to mark World Down Syndrome Day. Rather than reading anything I have to say, a far better use of your time would be to read what Ms. Humberstone said. You can find the full text here; if you scroll down… // Read More »

The Gift of Finitude

Posted March 1st, 2017 by Chris Ralston

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about finitude. About limits. Incompleteness. Even failure. Like the friend of a friend who is dying and has just been admitted to hospice, whose young teenaged daughter is facing the prospect of a life without her mother. Like the colleague who is grieving the loss of both a spouse and a parent within a month of each other. Like… // Read More »

Pain-Capable Abortion Bans

Posted June 26th, 2016 by Philip Thompson

More than three decades ago, I went to visit a friend who was hospitalized at NIH in Bethesda, Maryland. On the way from the parking lot to her room, I encountered a group of animal rights activists protesting the use of animals in medical research. To this day I vividly remember the chant they repeated again and again: “A cat is a rat is a… // Read More »

Testing, testing: Prenatal genetic screening

Posted June 10th, 2016 by Joe Gibes

The June 2016 issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology includes a study of the conversations between patients and “Health Care Providers” about prenatal genetic screening (PGS). The objective of the study was to “assess how obstetric health care providers counsel patients regarding prenatal genetic screening and how these conversations influence patients’ screening decisions.” PGS refers to blood and ultrasound tests performed early in pregnancy to determine… // Read More »

Medical errors and more medical errors

Posted May 8th, 2016 by Joe Gibes

Last week the BMJ reported that annually, there are 251,000 hospital deaths due to preventable medical errors in the US. There’s some debate about the calculations that they used to arrive at that number, and about what exactly constitutes a medical error. However, rather than quibble over the fine points, let’s acknowledge that medical errors are an ethical problem that must be addressed. In this… // Read More »

Oh, Those Darned Terms!

Posted September 14th, 2015 by Tom Garigan

In a recent post Jon Holmlund cited Thomas B. Edsall’s op-ed in the New York Times, “The Republican Conception of Conception.” Edsall was referring to the concept that life begins at conception. It is his hope that Republicans either stake a consistent position regarding the morality of post-conception “contraception” and incur the disfavor of the electorate, or abandon their “moral purity” in favor of “pragmatism” and… // Read More »

Seeing the Horror

Posted August 24th, 2015 by Tom Garigan

A video released by The Center for Medical Progress (CMP)  about Planned Parenthood included these words: “Some viewers may find this content disturbing.” It was to warn the viewer about the images of piled fetal body parts dumped from a bag by an abortion clinic worker. What might be most disturbing…and chilling…is not the body parts, but the casual and glib attitudes of the Planned Parenthood… // Read More »

In Memoriam

Posted May 25th, 2015 by Tom Garigan

Memorial Day serves as a holiday so that, we might hope, we pause to remember those who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. We might take a holiday from thinking about things bioethical as well. But could this day hold a lesson for the field of bioethics? To set aside a day to remember those who died in defense of freedom is not simply… // Read More »