Bioethics @ TIU

Citizenship, Surrogacy and the Power of ART

Posted February 6th, 2018 by Mark McQuain

A recent LA Times article by Alene Tchekmedyian explores a complicated case involving birthright citizenship, surrogacy and same-sex marriage. Briefly, a California man, Andrew Banks, married an Israeli man, Elad Dvash, in 2010. At the time, same-sex marriage was not legal in the US leaving Elad unable to acquire a green card for residency (via the marriage) so the couple moved to Canada where Andrew… // Read More »

Fertility with frozen eggs: not a sure thing

Posted February 1st, 2018 by Jon Holmlund

In case you didn’t see it, the Washington Post has this story about how more women are trying to improve their overall chances of having a baby—particularly in the later reproductive years of their 30’s and 40’s—but success is far from certain.  Human oocytes (eggs) are fragile things, and it was not until recent years that freezing techniques developed to a point that would allow… // Read More »

Selection of embryos in IVF to increase birth rates

Posted January 17th, 2018 by Steve Phillips

A recent article in the Daily Mail brought my attention to recent research by the British assisted reproduction scientist Simon Fishel (see abstract) on a technique which can help select which early developing embryos produced by IVF are most likely to result in a live birth when they are implanted. This technique in evolves repeatedly photographing the developing embryos and using a computerized process to… // Read More »

Christmas and the personhood of the unborn

Posted December 13th, 2017 by Steve Phillips

One of the most interesting details of the account of Jesus’ birth in the gospels is what happened when Mary visited her cousin Elizabeth. Luke tells us in the first chapter of his gospel that Elizabeth and her husband Zechariah were infertile and beyond their childbearing years. The angel Gabriel appeared to Zechariah and told him that he and his wife were going to have… // Read More »

Seeing having children as a harm

Posted December 6th, 2017 by Steve Phillips

A recent Breakpoint article led me to read an opinion piece on nbcnews.com by Travis Rieder, a research scholar with the Berman Institute of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins, titled “Science proves kids are bad for Earth. Morality suggests we stop having them.” Rieder references several articles that indicate that the most effective way that individuals, particularly those in affluent societies, can reduce their impact on… // Read More »

Uterine Transplantation – for Men?

Posted December 5th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

Susan Haack began exploring the topic of uterine transplantation in women on this blog back in February 2014. In just under 4 short years, the technology has not only successfully resulted in live births in several women who received the uterine transplants, but outgoing president of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, Dr. Richard Paulson, is suggesting we consider exploring the technique in men. While… // Read More »

Is Your Polygenic Risk Score a Good Thing?

Posted November 21st, 2017 by Mark McQuain

Back in October, Jon Holmlund wrote a blog entry regarding the popular company 23andMe and their collection of your health-related information along with your genetic material. I missed the significance of that relationship at the time. It took a recent article in Technology Review by my favorite technology writer Antonio Regalado to raise my ethical antennae. In his article, he explains the nexus of big… // Read More »

More about gene therapy and human gene editing

Posted November 16th, 2017 by Jon Holmlund

To my post of last week, add the case of a 44 year-old man who has received gene therapy for an inherited metabolic disease called Hunter’s syndrome. This is another example of a form of gene editing as true therapy.  That is, an existing individual is given a construct intended to edit his genes to introduce a gene that makes an enzyme that is lacking… // Read More »

There’s gene therapy and there’s gene therapy

Posted November 9th, 2017 by Jon Holmlund

I’ve seen a number of different things described in the general press as “gene therapy.” But they are indeed different.  It’s important to be specific. For one, there’s the situation where a set of mature human cells are obtained from the person to be treated and genetically altered outside the body to make them into a potentially useful treatment, then re-administered (by vein) to the… // Read More »

Selective data collection – what do we know about the risks of IVF?

Posted October 18th, 2017 by Steve Phillips

A recent article in Newsweek reports on a physician, Dr. Jennifer Snyder, who is calling for the formation of a registry of egg donors to help determine the risks to women who “donate” eggs to other women undergoing IVF for monetary compensation. Her motivation in calling for this registry was the death of her daughter at age 31 from cancer after donated eggs on three… // Read More »