Bioethics @ TIU

Will Medical Compliance Ever Become Non-Voluntary?

Posted January 16th, 2018 by Mark McQuain

A recent article by Dr. Lisa Rosenbaum in the New England Journal of Medicine explored both the benefits and drawbacks of Digital Adherence Monitoring. The focus was on the FDA’s recent approval of Abilify MyCite, a medicine technology that combines the medication aripiprazole, used to treat various psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia, certain features of bipolar disorder and depression, with a digital ingestion tracking system…. // Read More »

Racial inequalities in cancer survival

Posted December 9th, 2017 by Joe Gibes

Three studies published in a supplemental issue of the journal Cancer this month come to disturbing conclusions: in the United States, the survival rates for colon, breast, and ovarian cancer are lower for black people than for white people. The news isn’t all bad: overall cancer survival rates are going up. The three studies mentioned here draw from two larger studies of worldwide cancer survival, the CONCORD… // Read More »

Uterine Transplantation – for Men?

Posted December 5th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

Susan Haack began exploring the topic of uterine transplantation in women on this blog back in February 2014. In just under 4 short years, the technology has not only successfully resulted in live births in several women who received the uterine transplants, but outgoing president of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, Dr. Richard Paulson, is suggesting we consider exploring the technique in men. While… // Read More »

Being thankful

Posted November 22nd, 2017 by Steve Phillips

My wife is a writer. She writes everything from murder ministries, for which I am occasionally the in-house consultant, to a humor column and, of course, a blog. For years she has written a column at this time of year about the weird things that she is thankful for. You can read this year’s list here. I am not the accomplished writer that my wife… // Read More »

Is Your Polygenic Risk Score a Good Thing?

Posted November 21st, 2017 by Mark McQuain

Back in October, Jon Holmlund wrote a blog entry regarding the popular company 23andMe and their collection of your health-related information along with your genetic material. I missed the significance of that relationship at the time. It took a recent article in Technology Review by my favorite technology writer Antonio Regalado to raise my ethical antennae. In his article, he explains the nexus of big… // Read More »

Is Medical Artificial Intelligence Ethically Neutral?

Posted November 7th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

Will Knight has written several articles over this past year in MIT’s flagship journal Technology Review that have discussed growing concerns in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) that may be of concern for bioethicists. The first concern is in the area of bias. In an article entitled “Forget Killer Robots – Bias is the Real AI Danger”, Knight provides real world examples of this… // Read More »

Regarding objections to the change in the contraceptive coverage rule

Posted October 19th, 2017 by Jon Holmlund

The Journal of the American Medical Association carries a “Viewpoint” piece that categorically rejects the Trump administration’s reversal of its predecessor’s mandate that employer-based health insurance include payments for contraceptives.  As reported in the general press, the current administration’s new stance was hailed by religious and other political conservatives as a welcome support of conscience rights. Read the article here.  Briefly, some key points and… // Read More »

Dr. Smartphone

Posted October 17th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

My brother tells me my doctoring days are done. We keep up a lively, ongoing email discussion of current technologies as they relate to topics such as big data analysis, Internet of Things (IoT), and smartphone technology. He recently challenged me that due to the rapid increase in computational power and sophistication of data analysis, smartphones will soon replace doctors as the main source of… // Read More »

Mental Health ERISA Law for Dummies

Posted September 19th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

My son is an ERISA attorney whose present work requires him to make sure that large group insurance plans offered by companies comply with various federal statutes, such as the various regulations surrounding the PPACA (i.e. ObamaCare). In one of our recent discussions about healthcare access, he made me aware of some federal laws regarding the provision of mental health benefits, which I was heretofore… // Read More »

The unbefriended and their doctors

Posted September 16th, 2017 by Joe Gibes

There is a rapidly growing class of uniquely vulnerable patients showing up on our hospital doorsteps. Referred to as the unbefriended, or more prosaically as the unrepresented, these are patients who have no capacity to make medical decisions themselves, have no advance directives, and have no family or friends or anybody else on the face of the earth to speak for them. It is as… // Read More »