Parental Guidance Before and After Birth

 

As I sat sipping coffee and reading articles on the moral implications of genetic interventions in the germ-line (don’t yawn), a perfect picture was painted at the table across from me.  A young and boisterous child spoke of his aspirations for the future, vehemently proclaiming to a doubting adult audience, “I want to be a teacher, a singer, a dancer, a hospital man, I want to be everything.”

 

His ambitions were a bit outlandish.

 

His father, or who I believed to be his father, responded: “Do you know how you can be all of those things? You can be an actor.  This way you can be a teacher one day, and a singer another, and…”

 

“No, I want to be them all!”– Clearly the aspirations of the father were distinct from that of the son.

 

Imagine, if you will, that your direct (active) influence on your child could begin before conception. What if you could unify your aspirations before birth? No longer would you have to squelch his dreams as he bellows across Starbucks…

 

Although this is not yet in our grasp, Gender selection and disease screening are already a possibility. What if more options become available?

 

John Harris, recognizing this future possibility in his book Enhancing Evolution, avows an ethical parity in genetic interventions before conception and parental influences after birth. Could this be true?  Are encouraging your child to play an instrument and (in some future world) fashioning an embryo to be a world-class musician morally equivalent?

 

I would say there is a distinct difference between choosing for our children potential traits in embryo and guiding our children along in life. No doubt both influences are according to parental values. However, by choosing traits we are no longer discussing influence in terms of persuasion and direction, we are discussing a new kind of coercion.

 

What do you think?

 

Kaddish “I Am Here”

This past fall, I had the privilege of attending the Houston Symphony’s production of

A prisoner in a special chamber responds to changing air pressure during high-altitude experiments. 1942. Dachau, Germany

Kaddish.  The Kaddish Project seeks to commemorate the noble struggle of individual Holocaust survivors, including four who have made their homes in Houston.  Much of my research at Trinity focused on the concept of personhood, that we are more than just biological systems but instead are “someones,” persons.  I couldn’t help but think of this as I heard the chorus sing the song of the persecuted Jews: I am someone and “I am here.”  Though mocked and beaten in the streets even in the days before World War II, the Jewish people of Europe taught their children that they were of value even though others thought otherwise.  The soloists and chorus related the story of one survivor’s recollection of a concentration camp.  When the prisoners arrived, those under 14 years of age and over 65 were separated to the left and killed.  They were less than optimal for the German labor camp, so they were eliminated.  Kaddish led me to reflect on how physicians were a significant part of the German “Final Solution.”  They were the ones who deemed the crippled and deformed, the mentally deranged and deficient economic burdens.  That’s why I think that as we look for disease and perform technical procedures, it’s important for us to remember that our patients are someones who we must relate to and care for.