Bioethics @ TIU

One Man’s Trash is Another Man’s DNA Treasure

Posted May 15th, 2018 by Mark McQuain

Last month, investigators used big data analysis, public DNA genealogy websites and “Discarded DNA” to identify the Golden State Killer (WSJ subscription needed), an individual believed responsible for over 12 murders, greater than 50 rapes and over 100 burglaries in California between 1974 through 1986. While justice may be served if the legal case remains solid, there are some interesting bioethical issues that warrant discussion…. // Read More »

More on genetic medicine

Posted May 3rd, 2018 by Jon Holmlund

The third and final installment from The Code, a series of 3 short documentaries on the internet about the origins of genetic medicine, is entitled “Selling the Code.”  This is about genetic testing to try to predict risks of diseases, among other things.  Doctors use some of this testing in clinical care and a burgeoning amount of research.  A number of companies, such as 23andMe,… // Read More »

New short videos on genetic topics

Posted April 5th, 2018 by Jon Holmlund

This week, an email from the Hastings Center promoted The Code, a series of 3 short documentaries on the internet about the origins of genetic medicine.  The three are being released one week at a time.  The first, released this week, briefly (12 minutes) reviews the determination, or sequencing, of the entire human genome, a project conducted in the 1990’s, and completed in 2000, by… // Read More »

Toward true public engagement about gene editing

Posted March 29th, 2018 by Jon Holmlund

The March 22, 2018 edition of Nature includes two thoughtful, helpful commentaries about improving the public dialogue around “bleeding edge” biotechnologies.  In this case, the example is gene editing, of which one commentator, Simon Burall from the U.K., says, “Like artificial intelligence, gene editing could radically alter almost every domain of life.”  Burall’s piece, “Don’t wait for an outcry about gene editing,” can be found… // Read More »

Resources regarding ethics of gene editing

Posted March 23rd, 2018 by Jon Holmlund

Recently, two resources have become available regarding gene editing and the issues raised by it. First, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine have made available an archive of its February 22 webinar about human gene editing.  The home page for the Academies’ human gene-editing initiative is here.  A link to the archived webinar is here.  The slides can also just be viewed here…. // Read More »

DIY CRISPR Kits – Gene Editing for the Rest of Us

Posted February 20th, 2018 by Mark McQuain

One might think with the amazing advance of technology and easy access to nearly infinite data via the Internet that we, as a society, would see a reduction in false claims of benefit for novel medical procedures and untested medications. Sadly, it seems to be just the opposite. I seem to be spending gradually more time with my patients reviewing the results of their internet… // Read More »

Citizenship, Surrogacy and the Power of ART

Posted February 6th, 2018 by Mark McQuain

A recent LA Times article by Alene Tchekmedyian explores a complicated case involving birthright citizenship, surrogacy and same-sex marriage. Briefly, a California man, Andrew Banks, married an Israeli man, Elad Dvash, in 2010. At the time, same-sex marriage was not legal in the US leaving Elad unable to acquire a green card for residency (via the marriage) so the couple moved to Canada where Andrew… // Read More »

Update on clinical studies of human gene editing

Posted January 24th, 2018 by Jon Holmlund

The January 22 edition of The Wall Street Journal carried an article the essential message of which was, “the Chinese are ahead of us in gene editing.”  Specifically, more human clinical trials are active in China than in the US using gene editing in some form to treat people with specific diseases.  Some of these trials use the “hot, new” CRISPR-Cas9 approach to gene editing. … // Read More »

Is Your Polygenic Risk Score a Good Thing?

Posted November 21st, 2017 by Mark McQuain

Back in October, Jon Holmlund wrote a blog entry regarding the popular company 23andMe and their collection of your health-related information along with your genetic material. I missed the significance of that relationship at the time. It took a recent article in Technology Review by my favorite technology writer Antonio Regalado to raise my ethical antennae. In his article, he explains the nexus of big… // Read More »

More about gene therapy and human gene editing

Posted November 16th, 2017 by Jon Holmlund

To my post of last week, add the case of a 44 year-old man who has received gene therapy for an inherited metabolic disease called Hunter’s syndrome. This is another example of a form of gene editing as true therapy.  That is, an existing individual is given a construct intended to edit his genes to introduce a gene that makes an enzyme that is lacking… // Read More »