Bioethics @ TIU

More on genetic medicine

Posted May 3rd, 2018 by Jon Holmlund

The third and final installment from The Code, a series of 3 short documentaries on the internet about the origins of genetic medicine, is entitled “Selling the Code.”  This is about genetic testing to try to predict risks of diseases, among other things.  Doctors use some of this testing in clinical care and a burgeoning amount of research.  A number of companies, such as 23andMe,… // Read More »

Deep Brain Stimulation: the New Mood Modifier?

Posted May 1st, 2018 by Mark McQuain

A patient of mine recently had a deep brain stimulator (DBS) placed to reduce her severe tremors. The stimulator has worked very well to almost eliminate her tremor but has resulted in a side effect that causes her personality to be more impulsive. Her husband notices this more than the patient. Both agree that the reduction in the tremor outweigh the change in her personality… // Read More »

Toward true public engagement about gene editing

Posted March 29th, 2018 by Jon Holmlund

The March 22, 2018 edition of Nature includes two thoughtful, helpful commentaries about improving the public dialogue around “bleeding edge” biotechnologies.  In this case, the example is gene editing, of which one commentator, Simon Burall from the U.K., says, “Like artificial intelligence, gene editing could radically alter almost every domain of life.”  Burall’s piece, “Don’t wait for an outcry about gene editing,” can be found… // Read More »

Resources regarding ethics of gene editing

Posted March 23rd, 2018 by Jon Holmlund

Recently, two resources have become available regarding gene editing and the issues raised by it. First, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine have made available an archive of its February 22 webinar about human gene editing.  The home page for the Academies’ human gene-editing initiative is here.  A link to the archived webinar is here.  The slides can also just be viewed here…. // Read More »

The Bioethics of a Modern Death Mask

Posted March 20th, 2018 by Mark McQuain

By the time you read this, a company called Nectome will have pitched its business plan to investors at Y Combinator as a company who has designed a technology called Aldehyde-Stabilized Cryopreservation to preserve all of your connectome, which is all of your brain’s interconnected synapses. Doing this, they argue, can preserve your memories, allowing the company to effectively “upload your mind”. One problem with… // Read More »

DIY CRISPR Kits – Gene Editing for the Rest of Us

Posted February 20th, 2018 by Mark McQuain

One might think with the amazing advance of technology and easy access to nearly infinite data via the Internet that we, as a society, would see a reduction in false claims of benefit for novel medical procedures and untested medications. Sadly, it seems to be just the opposite. I seem to be spending gradually more time with my patients reviewing the results of their internet… // Read More »

The Brain and The Internet

Posted January 2nd, 2018 by Mark McQuain

The current Technology Review contains an article by Adam Piore featuring Dr. Eric Leuthardt, who, as the title claims, is “The [Neuro]Surgeon Who Wants to Connect You to the Internet with a Brain Implant”. After spending Christmas with my married millennial children, I am convinced there are no further connections required. But Dr. Leuthardt isn’t satisfied with clumsy thumbs and smartphones – he wants a… // Read More »

The Hubris of Head Transplantation

Posted December 19th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

As a rehabilitation physician with an interest in acute spinal cord injury, I try to keep abreast of neuroscience research both in animals and humans that might suggest a breakthrough in spinal cord injury recovery. Sadly, despite increased awareness by the general public from high-profile individuals who suffered this devastating injury (notably Christopher Reeve and his foundation), ongoing research in chemical, cellular transplant (including some… // Read More »

“Nervy” SHEEFs, pain, and moral status

Posted December 14th, 2017 by Jon Holmlund

In May of this year, my brief essays (literally, “attempts”) on synthetic human entities with embryo-like features, or SHEEFs for short, sought to ask what sort of human cellular constructs might or might not enjoy full human moral status; to wit, the right to life.  Some experimenters with SHEEFs have suggested that, since they may bypass the early (14 days of life) markers that normal,… // Read More »

Uterine Transplantation – for Men?

Posted December 5th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

Susan Haack began exploring the topic of uterine transplantation in women on this blog back in February 2014. In just under 4 short years, the technology has not only successfully resulted in live births in several women who received the uterine transplants, but outgoing president of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, Dr. Richard Paulson, is suggesting we consider exploring the technique in men. While… // Read More »