Bioethics @ TIU

Fairness in our moral critiques

Posted April 5th, 2017 by Steve Phillips

Recently a friend sent me a statement by a group of Christians in higher education which took a stand against prejudice and mistreatment toward women, racial minorities, and immigrants. I felt there was an implied request for me to endorse this statement. The statement grounded the concerns of this group on the understanding that all human beings are created in the image of God. I… // Read More »

A “disabled” person speaks out against a particular form of discrimination

Posted March 24th, 2017 by Joe Gibes

Amidst lots of dark and tragic stories, a bright ray on the BBC website this week: Kathleen Humberstone, a 17 year-old English girl with Down syndrome, addressed the UN in Geneva to mark World Down Syndrome Day. Rather than reading anything I have to say, a far better use of your time would be to read what Ms. Humberstone said. You can find the full text here; if you scroll down… // Read More »

The Gift of Finitude

Posted March 1st, 2017 by Chris Ralston

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about finitude. About limits. Incompleteness. Even failure. Like the friend of a friend who is dying and has just been admitted to hospice, whose young teenaged daughter is facing the prospect of a life without her mother. Like the colleague who is grieving the loss of both a spouse and a parent within a month of each other. Like… // Read More »

Caring and risk

Posted February 8th, 2017 by Steve Phillips

One of the basic realities of the medical profession is that caring for the sick may at times involve risk to physicians and others who are providing that care. Sometimes the risk is relatively minor such as when we care for those with minor respiratory infections and may become ill ourselves. That seemed to happen to me every time I was on a pediatrics rotation… // Read More »

Christian ethics and the powerless

Posted November 23rd, 2016 by Steve Phillips

The recent political campaign and election week have had many of us thinking about politics and government. For those of us who look at bioethics from a biblical perspective we have had to think about how our perspective on moral issues affects public policy and how we as a people govern ourselves. What do we do when no one seems to support a public policy… // Read More »

Race & Physician Assisted Suicide

Posted October 24th, 2016 by Neil Skjoldal

Is physician-assisted suicide only for white people? That is a question that came to mind when reading a recent Washington Post article by Fenit Nirappil that reports on the proposed “Right to Die” law in Washington, D.C.  The law is drawing opposition from members of the African American community. The Post article quotes a Georgetown Law School professor, Patricia King, who states, “Historically, African Americans have not… // Read More »

The cost-effectiveness of prenatal screening for Down syndrome

Posted September 28th, 2016 by Steve Phillips

Because the British National Health Service is a governmental single-payer system decisions about what is covered in that system involve public discussion. That leads to public discussion of ethical issues that frequently manage to avoid the public eye in the US. A recent article in the Daily Mail talks about an issue that is being debated by the British NHS. They are currently deciding whether… // Read More »

Gender Indiscrimination

Posted June 15th, 2016 by Mark McQuain

Steve Phillips has recently written in this blog about gender dysphoria and our culture’s struggle to respond consistently to it. Please see here for that discussion. North Carolina recently passed a law requiring individuals to use the bathroom of their biologic sex rather than their self-identified gender. This has resulted in claims of gender discrimination and gender phobia against those who do not wish to… // Read More »

Body Integrity: Choice vs Design?

Posted November 26th, 2015 by Jon Holmlund

In my search for new topics I ran across the obscure “Body Integrity Identity Disorder,” or BIID.  This is described as a condition—if, indeed, it is a legitimate diagnosis—in which a person is troubled by the presence of a perfectly healthy body part, nominally a limb, and wants it amputated to restore a sense of personal wholeness.  One 2009 review argues that this is a… // Read More »

Are we losing the concept of objective moral truth within the church?

Posted November 25th, 2015 by Steve Phillips

I participated in two discussions in the past few weeks that have me concerned. The first was a discussion with the members of the Advisory Council that works with the Center for Ethics that I am involved with at Taylor University. We were discussing how we as Christians should live in a society that is rejecting Christian moral values more and more. One member of… // Read More »