Bioethics @ TIU

Fertility with frozen eggs: not a sure thing

Posted February 1st, 2018 by Jon Holmlund

In case you didn’t see it, the Washington Post has this story about how more women are trying to improve their overall chances of having a baby—particularly in the later reproductive years of their 30’s and 40’s—but success is far from certain.  Human oocytes (eggs) are fragile things, and it was not until recent years that freezing techniques developed to a point that would allow… // Read More »

Update on clinical studies of human gene editing

Posted January 24th, 2018 by Jon Holmlund

The January 22 edition of The Wall Street Journal carried an article the essential message of which was, “the Chinese are ahead of us in gene editing.”  Specifically, more human clinical trials are active in China than in the US using gene editing in some form to treat people with specific diseases.  Some of these trials use the “hot, new” CRISPR-Cas9 approach to gene editing. … // Read More »

Selection of embryos in IVF to increase birth rates

Posted January 17th, 2018 by Steve Phillips

A recent article in the Daily Mail brought my attention to recent research by the British assisted reproduction scientist Simon Fishel (see abstract) on a technique which can help select which early developing embryos produced by IVF are most likely to result in a live birth when they are implanted. This technique in evolves repeatedly photographing the developing embryos and using a computerized process to… // Read More »

Will Medical Compliance Ever Become Non-Voluntary?

Posted January 16th, 2018 by Mark McQuain

A recent article by Dr. Lisa Rosenbaum in the New England Journal of Medicine explored both the benefits and drawbacks of Digital Adherence Monitoring. The focus was on the FDA’s recent approval of Abilify MyCite, a medicine technology that combines the medication aripiprazole, used to treat various psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia, certain features of bipolar disorder and depression, with a digital ingestion tracking system…. // Read More »

The Brain and The Internet

Posted January 2nd, 2018 by Mark McQuain

The current Technology Review contains an article by Adam Piore featuring Dr. Eric Leuthardt, who, as the title claims, is “The [Neuro]Surgeon Who Wants to Connect You to the Internet with a Brain Implant”. After spending Christmas with my married millennial children, I am convinced there are no further connections required. But Dr. Leuthardt isn’t satisfied with clumsy thumbs and smartphones – he wants a… // Read More »

The Hubris of Head Transplantation

Posted December 19th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

As a rehabilitation physician with an interest in acute spinal cord injury, I try to keep abreast of neuroscience research both in animals and humans that might suggest a breakthrough in spinal cord injury recovery. Sadly, despite increased awareness by the general public from high-profile individuals who suffered this devastating injury (notably Christopher Reeve and his foundation), ongoing research in chemical, cellular transplant (including some… // Read More »

“Nervy” SHEEFs, pain, and moral status

Posted December 14th, 2017 by Jon Holmlund

In May of this year, my brief essays (literally, “attempts”) on synthetic human entities with embryo-like features, or SHEEFs for short, sought to ask what sort of human cellular constructs might or might not enjoy full human moral status; to wit, the right to life.  Some experimenters with SHEEFs have suggested that, since they may bypass the early (14 days of life) markers that normal,… // Read More »

Uterine Transplantation – for Men?

Posted December 5th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

Susan Haack began exploring the topic of uterine transplantation in women on this blog back in February 2014. In just under 4 short years, the technology has not only successfully resulted in live births in several women who received the uterine transplants, but outgoing president of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, Dr. Richard Paulson, is suggesting we consider exploring the technique in men. While… // Read More »

Is Your Polygenic Risk Score a Good Thing?

Posted November 21st, 2017 by Mark McQuain

Back in October, Jon Holmlund wrote a blog entry regarding the popular company 23andMe and their collection of your health-related information along with your genetic material. I missed the significance of that relationship at the time. It took a recent article in Technology Review by my favorite technology writer Antonio Regalado to raise my ethical antennae. In his article, he explains the nexus of big… // Read More »

More about gene therapy and human gene editing

Posted November 16th, 2017 by Jon Holmlund

To my post of last week, add the case of a 44 year-old man who has received gene therapy for an inherited metabolic disease called Hunter’s syndrome. This is another example of a form of gene editing as true therapy.  That is, an existing individual is given a construct intended to edit his genes to introduce a gene that makes an enzyme that is lacking… // Read More »