Bioethics @ TIU

Care Dis-integration

Posted May 22nd, 2018 by Tom Garigan

The May 3rd edition of the New England Journal of Medicine brings us a powerful story. It is a tale of a patient, named Kenneth, written by his physician brother. Central to the story is a delay in diagnosis, brought on by unfamiliarity with the patient as a whole person, biases against those with mental illness, presumptions and other errors familiar to those of us… // Read More »

One Man’s Trash is Another Man’s DNA Treasure

Posted May 15th, 2018 by Mark McQuain

Last month, investigators used big data analysis, public DNA genealogy websites and “Discarded DNA” to identify the Golden State Killer (WSJ subscription needed), an individual believed responsible for over 12 murders, greater than 50 rapes and over 100 burglaries in California between 1974 through 1986. While justice may be served if the legal case remains solid, there are some interesting bioethical issues that warrant discussion…. // Read More »

My Day at the Florida Bioethics Network Conference–2018

Posted May 7th, 2018 by Neil Skjoldal

For the past several years, it has been my privilege to attend the annual conference of the Florida Bioethics Network.  As in prior years, this year’s conference showed the great range of topics that fall under the umbrella of bioethics.   Topics included the so-called “Tattoo DNR,” a discussion of medical marijuana, the potential promise of an electronic and interactive informed consent document, and even a discussion of… // Read More »

Belgian Euthanasia: Volunteers No Longer Necessary?

Posted March 6th, 2018 by Mark McQuain

A recent resignation letter by one member of Belgium’s Euthanasia Commission suggests the slippery slope of who meets the criteria for legal euthanasia is becoming even more slippery. Dr. Ledo Vanopdenbosch sent his resignation letter to members of the Belgian Parliament who oversee the commission. His concern was with one of the main requirements of the law, which demands that the individual patient formally request… // Read More »

Will Medical Compliance Ever Become Non-Voluntary?

Posted January 16th, 2018 by Mark McQuain

A recent article by Dr. Lisa Rosenbaum in the New England Journal of Medicine explored both the benefits and drawbacks of Digital Adherence Monitoring. The focus was on the FDA’s recent approval of Abilify MyCite, a medicine technology that combines the medication aripiprazole, used to treat various psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia, certain features of bipolar disorder and depression, with a digital ingestion tracking system…. // Read More »

Racial inequalities in cancer survival

Posted December 9th, 2017 by Joe Gibes

Three studies published in a supplemental issue of the journal Cancer this month come to disturbing conclusions: in the United States, the survival rates for colon, breast, and ovarian cancer are lower for black people than for white people. The news isn’t all bad: overall cancer survival rates are going up. The three studies mentioned here draw from two larger studies of worldwide cancer survival, the CONCORD… // Read More »

Uterine Transplantation – for Men?

Posted December 5th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

Susan Haack began exploring the topic of uterine transplantation in women on this blog back in February 2014. In just under 4 short years, the technology has not only successfully resulted in live births in several women who received the uterine transplants, but outgoing president of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, Dr. Richard Paulson, is suggesting we consider exploring the technique in men. While… // Read More »

Dr. Smartphone

Posted October 17th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

My brother tells me my doctoring days are done. We keep up a lively, ongoing email discussion of current technologies as they relate to topics such as big data analysis, Internet of Things (IoT), and smartphone technology. He recently challenged me that due to the rapid increase in computational power and sophistication of data analysis, smartphones will soon replace doctors as the main source of… // Read More »

Mental Health ERISA Law for Dummies

Posted September 19th, 2017 by Mark McQuain

My son is an ERISA attorney whose present work requires him to make sure that large group insurance plans offered by companies comply with various federal statutes, such as the various regulations surrounding the PPACA (i.e. ObamaCare). In one of our recent discussions about healthcare access, he made me aware of some federal laws regarding the provision of mental health benefits, which I was heretofore… // Read More »

Ethical Health Care Reform

Posted July 21st, 2017 by Joe Gibes

Recently I heard a Christian TV personality refer to Obamacare as “iniquitous.” This started me thinking, What would make a health care funding reform scheme “iniquitous”? Or, although the words aren’t synonymous, what would make such a scheme unethical? What should go into ethical health care reform? The answers to these questions are legion and conflicting. There are some who see government intervention as inherently… // Read More »