Essential Services

Until the pandemic, no one spent much time wondering about whether something was an “essential service”. This designation has granted necessary special exceptions to community mobility access restrictions created by government imposed “shelter-in-place“ orders instituted to slow the spread of the virus. Throughout the pandemic, determining what was and still is considered essential has been an interesting debate not without its bioethical issues .

Merriam-Webster Dictionary says that the adjective essential “implies belonging to the very nature of a thing and therefore being incapable of removal without destroying the thing itself or its character.” With respect to the COVID-19 pandemic, an essential service is one that provides for or protects the life of any person, as life is certainly one thing that everyone seems to agree pertains to the nature of a human being. Therefore, anyone whose job it is to provide for or protect the life of another is providing an essential service. Easily included in that group are those at the front lines of disease management such as doctors, nurses, and first responder EMTs. The list also requires jobs that provide distribution or protection of our daily needs such as grocers (“milk and bread”), pharmacies, utility workers, various government services, firefighters, police, transportation services and nursing home providers. The list then quickly expands to suppliers of those jobs like farmers, medical equipment manufacturers, gas stations, and, well, the list goes on.

In Denver, the list of essential services promulgated by the mayor initially did not contain liquor stores and recreational marijuana shops (though that list did include medical marijuana dispensaries). Within hours of the release of the initial essential services list, after a strong public outcry, those businesses were reclassified as essential. Apparently, a large number of Denver residents believed that services provided by liquor stores and recreational marijuana shops were essential to their lives.

More recently, various religious groups are arguing with their respective governors that their religious services are also essential and therefore churches deserve to be opened sooner rather than later. The variability between the various states as to how each relaxes its own public access restrictions has likely contributed to these disagreements leading to several lawsuits. The Supreme Court just ruled against a California church in a case balancing religious liberty and public health. While public health concerns were indeed cited as the main issue, also at issue was the classification/determination of how essential was the service in question (i.e into what tier was the church service placed compared with other non-religious, non-essential services). In other words, how essential was the non-essential service?

Answers to the questions about the essence of a human being provide the basis for our bioethics. One’s worldview affects those answers. The open debate as to whether human essence transcends death should at least give us pause to reconsider the ranking in our list of essential services.

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