Justice & George Floyd

When I blogged last month, I thought surely that May would be an improvement over April. I was wrong. Now, with 100k deaths from COVID-19, and after several days of protests across the country in response to the death of George Floyd, I can’t possibly imagine what the summer will be like.

I watched two different documentaries over the past week – one on the life of writer Mark Twain and one on the life of President Ulysses S Grant. Even though they were two distinct individuals, their attitudes toward the horrific treatment of African Americans in the 19th century seemed remarkably similar, at least compared to the surrounding culture. It was especially disheartening to see how quickly the Reconstruction of post-Civil War America faded back into institutionalized racism. It is even more disheartening to see how race remains an issue in so many areas of contemporary life.

I have blogged on this site before on the racial disparities in health care. COVID-19 has exposed these disparities even further. It no longer surprises me when a family of color rejects talk from medical personnel about end of life care for a loved one as nothing more than a suspicious attempt to be rid of an under-resourced patient. (For more insight into this topic, please see the powerful op-ed by Dr Jessica Zitter in The New York Times last year.)

I am a middle-aged white male, born and educated in the United States.

I have never experienced systemic injustice.

I am not an expert on race relations.

However, it seems to me that many people of faith from my generation are committing the same grievous sin that previous generations have committed: we stand quietly by while watching the power structures of this country – both political and economic – systemically eviscerate the most basic of rights, all the while proclaiming that we believe that humans have been created in the image of God. (Dr John Kilner’s book, Dignity and Destiny: Humanity in the image of God [Eerdmans, 2015] carefully explains both the Bible’s teaching on the image of God, as well as the horrific things that happen when it is ignored.)

Justice is one of the foundational principles of bioethics. It is also one of the foundational principles of both the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Justice for George Floyd will not be reached simply by trying those responsible for his death. It will be reached when all humans are treated with dignity and respect.  Until that day, let us faithfully work towards that end.  (For a passionate and theological treatment of this issue, please listen to Rev Dr Charlie Date’s sermon from May 31 [sermon begins at minute 43:17].)

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