Trust and the Pandemic

One of the necessary requirements of a doctor-patient relationship is the establishment of trust in that relationship. A vulnerable patient presents to a physician who theoretically has the skill and knowledge necessary to help resolve the patient’s problem. Ultimately, the patient has to trust the information and treatment recommendations of his or her physician. Even in situations where the initial diagnosis turns out to be incorrect, it is the trust bond between the patient and physician that allows the two to proceed to other diagnostic and treatment options. If trust is lost, it is less likely the patient will have confidence in the information or treatment suggestions by that physician, often resulting in the patient looking elsewhere for treatment.

On a larger scale, the general population must trust the information and recommendations from their Public Health experts before they will be willing to follow treatment protocols, such as those presently in place for the COVID-19 pandemic. Loss of trust in those public health officials, for any reason, will not only lead the public to look for other sources of information and treatment options, it will also make them less likely to follow guidelines and restrictions currently in place, particularly if those guidelines and restrictions are viewed as inconvenient or harmful.

What does the public do when the usual trusted sources of information on the pandemic are shown to provide false information? Take for instance the recent CBS News story on long lines for testing at Cherry Health in Grand Rapids, MI. It turned out the long car lines awaiting virus testing at this particular testing facility were artificially exaggerated, with both the news network and the health system denying responsibility for the falsehood. Purposefully falsifying the data being shown to the public ostensibly being used to determine healthcare policy related to the pandemic does nothing to foster trust by the general population in either the health system or the news media.

What does the public do when two publicly acknowledged experts on the current pandemic claim the data that the CDC has provided them (and the public) are not only inaccurate but the two experts disagree as to whether the actual data represents an overestimation or underestimation of the problem? This link from the Philadelphia Inquirer quotes Dr Deborah Birx as saying “[t[here is nothing from the CDC that I can trust” in expressing her concern that the number of COVID-19 deaths reported by the CDC are inflated. The same article reports Dr Anthony Fauci expressing concern that the same CDC death toll represents an underestimation. It is no wonder that increasing friction is growing in multiple regions of the US as people struggle with the continued personal safety concerns regarding the virus and the growing economic disruption caused by our personal and public responses to the pandemic. Jerry Risser provided a thoughtful blog entry of the bioethical issues of this public health vs economics struggle (absent this present blog entry’s concern of data reliability)

A recent May 14th podcast from the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) provided some optimism in an interesting behind the scenes overview of how a respected medical journal like the NEJM determines how to provide reliable information on the current Pandemic. It is approximately 19 minutes of audio and is well worth review. While the NEJM is not perfect, they transparently discuss how they go about providing reliable, trustworthy medical information to the medical doctors on the front lines treating medical problems in general, and this pandemic in particular. They openly discuss several problems that NEJM has with the sheer magnitude of current data juxtaposed with the goal of getting information out to the public in a timely manner (8:15), the question of actual content selected for publication (complications vs clinical trials – 11:00), issues of best evidence (randomized trials vs how to treat the patient in front of the doctor right now- 12:10) and determining strategies to assist in opening up the economy (14:40). One gets the sense after listening to the podcast that smart people are truly trying to get the best data to the front-line people in public health in order to provide the best care possible and that is reassuring.

I suspect (trust?) that many other medical journals, public health authorities, federal, state and local government officials are working to do the same. One of my patients reminded me that even if that is not the case, Proverbs 3:5-6 is reassuring.

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