Bioethics and the Study of Health Care Economics

A recent Technology Review article by Peter Dizikes featured a review of the academic work of Dr. Amy Finkelstein, an MIT economics professor who arguably has changed the way we understand the economic impact of health insurance. Though not the primary focus of her work, her results have also led to a better understanding of health care itself. The article may be found HERE. Though a significant part of the article is biographical of Dr. Finkelstein’s academic career and is interesting in its own right, I want to focus on a couple of her findings for this blog entry.

The main study upon which the article focused was the result of an opportunity she identified in 2008 when the State of Oregon increased its enrollment in its Medicaid program by 10,000 people via a random lottery. This allowed her to compare the new enrollees health care access and behavior against a similar control group that had been randomly denied similar access. Some interesting new insights emerged. For instance, it was assumed that since the uninsured people routinely used the ER to access medical care, providing them Medicaid insurance would increase their access to routine care thus decreasing their use of ER care. What Dr. Finkelstein found was that the new Medicaid enrollees increased their visits to the ER and this increase remained elevated for at least 2 years compared with the control group. In fact, the new Medicaid group showed increased doctor visits overall, as well as increased prescription drug use and increased hospitalizations. Their out-of-pocket medical expenses and unpaid medical debt both decreased. And, while their physical health measures did not change appreciably, they reported increased good health and had less incidence of depression.

Additionally, the article summarized seven other interesting findings from Dr. Finkelstein’s body of work thus far. I will leave the reader to explore the whole article for these details. One result of a 2020 study that was particularly interesting to me as a physician was the current practice of so-called “hotspotting”, the practice of providing pro-active care to high-risk populations in an attempt to reduce the patient’s hospital readmissions. Dr. Finkelstein showed that hotspotting appears to have no significant benefit in reducing readmission rates of those patients. It is good to determine whether or not our medical protocols, which sound reasonable on their face and therefore appear justified, are in fact accomplishing their intended results, particularly since these programs require both additional time and financial resources.

The reason to highlight Dr. Finkelstein’s work in a bioethics blog is to reinforce the importance of using good data to make informed decisions in health care. Understanding the true effects of medical policies in health care access, insurance or provision is just as necessary as debating their bioethical challenges, as the former may make the latter debates either more fruitful or completely unnecessary.

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