Negative QALY Scores and Voluntary Euthanasia

I am all about saving money. I also enjoy reading the bioethical insights of Wesley Smith. His recent commentary in National Review entitled “Bioethicists: Euthanasia Will Save Money and Facilitate Organ Donations” naturally caught my eye. This blog has discussed the ethical problems with euthanasia and organ donation previously (see HERE and HERE). The focus of the remainder of this blog entry is to challenge the use of negative Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) as a utilitarian determinant of healthcare resource management, particularly with respect to voluntary euthanasia.

The article upon which Smith is commenting appeared in Clinical Ethics on March 10th by David Shaw and Alec Morton and was entitled “Counting the cost of denying assisted suicide” (full article behind firewall – abstract HERE). The authors briefly review the use of QALYs as used within the UK National Health System to determine cost/benefit of allocating medical resources. They explain the concept of negative QALYs, effectively time spent living (and suffering) in a state worse than death. They argue improvement occurs in the overall NHS net QALYs when there is reallocation of actual medical resources consumed “by patients who are denied assisted dying [and therefore experience negative QALYs]…instead be used to provide additional (positive) quality-adjusted life years for patients elsewhere in the healthcare system who wish to continue living and to improve their quality of life.” The argument essentially is that voluntary euthanasia prevents additional negative QALYs in the person requesting euthanasia and increases positive QALYs in one or more individuals in the population at large through the reallocation of the medical resources presently consumed by the person requesting euthanasia. Following the voluntary euthanasia and medical resource re-allocation, the NHS system is subsequently more efficient or economical since there are overall higher system QALYs given the same resources.

For this macabre exercise in utilitarian QALY mathematics to make sense, one has to grant that there is a state in life that is worse than death (by definition death is a QALY = zero). Individuals with terminal diseases and/or chronic pain stipulate their current state is indeed worse than death and therefore they experience a QALY less than zero – a negative QALY. They further believe they have no hope of ever achieving a state of positive QALY so argue their best option is voluntary euthanasia to reach death (so no more negative QALYs). Given all of this subjective stipulation, one might counter that other states of life might also exist that are also worse than death, such as the act of voluntary euthanasia. Perhaps it causes a transitional state of QALY much, much less than zero (something that “regular dying” does not)(since we are all just stipulating here) Any additional stipulations like this potentially further challenge their nice calculus.

Given the above, and perhaps more concerning, it is unclear (at least to this author) why Shaw and Morton used QALYs to score an act of voluntary euthanasia. It is unlikely that an individual goes through a similar calculus to determine whether his or her life is worth living with respect to the general population. He or she is deciding whether or not they want to continue living. They are not using a QALY score to justify their voluntary euthanasia decision to the population at large. So why the QALY score? Might such a calculus be used by one group to mathematically or scientifically justify imposing euthanasia upon another group, particularly within a system where medical resources are (becoming more) limited? Maybe it is just a way to suggest to those of us who find voluntary euthanasia morally wrong that it can’t be all that bad?

After all, it does save money.

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