Autonomy of Access vs. Autonomy of Decision Making in Opioid Addiction

A recent Perspective in The NEJM by Dr. Amy Caruso Brown discussed the ethics consultation involved in treating addiction as a terminal disease. Since the article is behind a subscription firewall, I will briefly summarize the case and some of the ethical problems outlined by Dr. Brown. The focus of this blog is to ask the limited question as to whether or not there is sufficient patient autonomy to make decisions in an addiction situation described as terminal if, as Dr. Brown claims, society has failed to provide sufficient access to and services for patients with chronic addiction and/or mental health problems associated with similar levels of addiction.

Dr. Brown’s patient, Ms. A, was an unemployed, homeless woman who had a history of chronic opioid use/abuse and had failed multiple impatient rehabilitation, methadone maintenance and buprenorphine treatment programs. She was hospitalized for septic shock secondary to endocarditis, which had damaged two heart valves to such a degree that she was not considered healthy enough to survive surgery to correct the problem. Her only relative, a brother, who had recently finally cut ties with his sister to protect exposing his children to her illness and habits, agreed to a do-not-resuscitate order. To the surprise of her treating staff, her condition stabilized to the point where the cardiothoracic surgeon agreed to operate. She declined, wanting to be discharged so she could seek morphine to self-treat the intractable chest pain. She fired her attending physician as he made the ethics consultation referral questioning her decision-making capacity.

Dr. Brown nicely outlines the particular issues of legal capacity requirements required in New York and the limited capacity that surrogates have if they we not previously designated as such. Dr. Brown also discussed whether or not Ms. A met the criteria for terminal illness, specifically whether or not ongoing chronic opioid addiction, in the face of now severe cardiac compromise, would be expected to cause death within 6 months. Dr. Brown maintained that Ms. A was lucid and capable to make informed decisions, which were that she “simply wanted to go home, or to a hospice facility, and die peacefully.” Dr. Brown did not find her depressed or emotionally compromised, though quoted her as saying “I’m done. I’m ready to be done. I’ve fought long enough” and described her as “exhausted and grieving”. Dr. Brown believed Ms. A’s “decisional capacity was clear.”

Finally, Dr. Brown argued that society had failed Ms. A by not facilitating access to a treatment program that “included medication for opioid use disorder (OUD) – preferably initiated in an inpatient setting and coupled with ongoing trauma-informed mental health care and various social supports – [in the absence of which Ms. A] would almost certainly have a relapse”, further making it likely she would die within 6 months. Though the article noted Ms. A had previously failed inpatient rehabilitation, methadone maintenance and buprenorphine, it was not stated how coordinated or integrated the previous programs were. Was the proposed program new or simply a second (or third) chance through a similar program? Thankfully, Ms. A decided to accept palliative terminal care, which resolved her homeless situation, as it would be provided at an inpatient facility.

What if Ms. A had declined inpatient palliative care? Dr. Brown made a strong case that Ms. A’s social situation (poor, homelessness, mental health history of abuse and chronic opioid dependence/abuse) limited access to an appropriate treatment program for her problems, likely the only one with any expectation of success, however limited. Even if we grant that Ms. A was indeed terminal and had clear decision-making ability not compromised by depression, ongoing opioid dependence and other mental health factors, did her social situation really allow her to be autonomous in decision making? Said differently, how can we consider her autonomous for decision-making when she apparently lacks autonomy for access to her treatment? Further, how much support can an individual demand or expect from society and still be considered autonomous? I have touched on a similar issue in this blog previously with regard to serial pregnancy in opioid addicted women, asking when should the risks to the children (and social and financial burden to society) supersede the mother’s autonomy for having more children?

We need to improve access to treatment and support for mental health in general and opioid treatment in particular. This will likely include further discussion regarding the level of autonomy of those needing that treatment and support.

0 0 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments