Dementia and the value of human life

Recent public reporting of some cases in Canada of people with dementia whose lives have been ended by euthanasia have caused me to think about the value of human life in those who have dementia. Canadian law requires the person whose life is ended by euthanasia to have mental capacity for informed consent, intolerable suffering, and a foreseeable death. It was initially thought that patients with dementia would not be candidates for euthanasia under the Canadian law because of the requirement for mental capacity, but now there euthanasia providers who have concluded that there are some patients with dementia who have sufficient symptoms from their dementia to qualify as having intolerable suffering but still have adequate decision-making capacity. The discussion there has focused on whether person who is at the stage of dementia that causes intolerable suffering can still have adequate mental capacity. I have a different concern.

When we try to define intolerable suffering in the context of euthanasia it appears to mean that the person who is requesting euthanasia has decided that the effects of an illness have reached the point that the illness has made his or her life not worth living. When we talk about intolerable suffering and euthanasia the first image that comes to mind is a person with excruciating and untreatable pain, but it turns out that pain is not the most common reason for people to request euthanasia. It is more commonly requested due to a loss of control and increased dependency. This is not surprising since we live in a society that places high value on independence and autonomy. However, is independence really what makes human life worth living or is that a widely believed but untrue fiction in our society? Aren’t we all dependent? As children we are dependent upon our parents. As we go through adulthood, we are dependent on spouses and friends. As we age, we become dependent on our children and neighbors. Loss of independence makes us more clearly human, not less human. The impairments of old age, whether they be physical or mental, make it harder for us to deny our dependency, but loss of control (which is what loss of independence is) and increased dependency should not be seen as something that makes life not worth living. It draws us deeper into the relationships that are an essential part of being human.

Living with dementia is difficult for the person with dementia and for those who love and care for persons with dementia, but it does not make the life of a person who has dementia not worth living. The person with dementia is still a person who has relationships that are important, even when the one with dementia can no longer remember who those people are, because the person with this dementia is still the same person. He or she is still the mother or father, sister or brother, or friend. He or she is still a uniquely created child of God. Our response to those who feel that life is no longer worth living because of the loss of cognitive abilities and independence should be to help them understand that their lives are worth living because they are valuable to us.

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