The importance of premises

In an interesting article in the Hastings Center Bioethics Forum, titled “Hannah Arendt in St. Peter’s Square,” Joseph Fins and Jenny Reardon write about the importance of deep ethical reflection in dealing with the ethical challenges of biomedical research. They point out that when ethics becomes a matter of simply following a set of rules we can end up in the wrong place. Even such fundamentally good concepts as informed consent and the need to have research proposals reviewed to be sure that they are ethically sound can lead to a mindset of regulatory compliance, essentially following the letter of the law, while leading to poor conclusions about what we ought to do. In the end they suggest that in order to facilitate deeper ethical thinking regarding new areas of biomedical research we need more interdisciplinary conversation between the sciences and engineering on one hand and the humanities and social sciences on the other. I think this is quite true and is a strong argument for a liberal education in its classic sense.

However, I find it particularly interesting how the thinking of Hannah Arendt enters into their discussion. Arendt was a German Jew who fled from Europe to the US in the Nazi era. She wrote about the kind of thinking that allowed the totalitarian regimes of Hitler and Stalin to gain control. Fins and Reardon focus on her idea that logical thinking can lead from a seemingly self-evident statement to a replacement of common sense with thinking that leads in a direction that is very wrong. They see a culture in medicine and science that considers ethics as a matter of regulatory compliance rather than deep reflection an example of this.

What I find most interesting in Arendt’s thinking is the idea that logic will lead to faulty conclusions if the premise is not true. The problem that she saw in the thinking leading to totalitarian regimes was not that the thinking was illogical. The problem was that the seemingly self-evident statements which were used as the premises were false. When we apply that to ethics it means that we will only reach sound ethical conclusions when we begin with moral premises that are true. A liberal education with interplay between the humanities and the sciences is one way to seek true premises for our ethical thinking in the wisdom that can be found in the interplay of academic disciplines. Another is to recognize that the existence of common sense morality suggests a source of moral wisdom that is beyond human wisdom. Christian ethics finds its premises in that higher source of moral wisdom. A Christian liberal education integrates them both.

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