Humanoid Mass Production

Henry Ford would be proud.

We now have the ability to mass produce humanoids, embryonic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells (the latter can be made from adult cells). These cells are specifically designed by researchers to have some but not all of the necessary elements to be fully human. The goal is to grow these humanoids beyond the current 14-day limitation imposed on research studies on human embryos that ARE fully human.  In theory, these humanoids are physiologically similar enough to humans that by observing their growth and development, scientists hope to learn about human development. By design, the claim is that humanoids are different enough from humans that they would not/could not /should not live outside the Petri Dish. The original report in Nature may be found here.

I use the Henry Ford analogy on purpose. He revolutionized the automobile industry by standardizing the manufacturing process such that less skilled laborers could sequentially assemble an automobile. This allowed the cars to be built faster, at higher volume and far less expensively. Previously, higher skilled craftsmen machined each unique part for each unique car. Though the cars looked the same, their parts were not interchangeable. The process was painstakingly slow, resulting in a very low production volume at a very high price. With mass production, cars became far more common,  much less expensive and, to some extent, disposable.

Moving toward a standardized “mass production” process will have the same effects for humanoid production. Standardizing the manufacturing process will reduce the variance of a given humanoid, making the scientific study of its growth more reliable, reproducible and less expensive, all good things from a scientific standpoint. Will it also cause us to view the humanoids as more disposable?

I continue to want more discussion on the moral status of humanoids before more experimentation is permitted, particularly as we extend their lifespans. Whatever they are, at minimum, they are living entities.  Humanoids must be more than the sum total of their individual cells otherwise we humans would not have so much interest in their development. How human-like does a humanoid have to be before we should consider additional human-like moral/ethical protection in humanoid experimentation?

Or their mass production?

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