Different answers to “Why?”

Sometimes when we ask “Why” we are really asking the mechanical or causation question: “How did something come to be?” In a billiards game, one might ask: “Why did the 8 ball go into the side pocket?” A valid answer might be: “It was struck by the 3 ball.” A reasonable follow-up question might be: “Why did the 3 ball strike the 8 ball?” Answer: “It was struck by the cue ball after a billiards player struck the cue ball with her stick.” These are correct mechanical explanations as to how the 8 ball came to go into the side pocket.

Sometimes when we ask “Why?” we are really asking: “For what purpose did something come to be?” In the previous billiards game, the answer to the question: “Why did the 8 ball go into the side pocket?” might be: “The player struck the cue ball which struck 3 ball which struck the 8 ball which went into to the side pocket so she could win the billiards game.” There was a purpose behind or beyond the physical or mechanistic description of the 8 ball falling into the side pocket.

Two opinion pieces asking “Why?” from medical and bioethical aspects were published within a week of one another and provide similar examples. The first was a NEJM Perspective by Anthony Breu entitled “Why is a Cow? Curiosity, Tweetorials, and the Return to Why” (subscription required). The second was by Stephen Phillips in this blog entitled “Why do we do this?”

In the first article, Dr. Breu begins with the classic infinite regression example of his 4-year old daughter asking “Why” to every response he provides to her previous “Why” question.

Daughter: “Why was [so-and-so] sleeping?”
Dr. Breu: “Because it was nighttime.”
Daughter: Why was it nighttime?”
Dr. Breu: “Because the earth rotates.”
Daughter: “Why does the earth rotate?”

Dr. Breu paused at this point because he did not immediately know why the earth rotated. He jokingly recalled that his own father terminated these inquisitions with: “Why is a cow?”, which Dr. Breu quickly learned meant the “Why Game” was over. The rest (and real emphasis) of the article discussed the benefits of encouraging medical curiosity in his students and the particular benefits of “Tweetorials”, Twitter posts that answer in-depth medical explanations of pathology. “Why does an acute hemorrhage cause anemia?” His Tweetorial provided a mechanistic answer to the question of why (or how) does anemia result from an acute hemorrhage.

Dr. Breu closes his article with the following answer to his daughter’s last question:

…the Earth rotates because of the angular momentum that resulted from asymmetrical gravitational accretion after the Big Bang. And if my daughter asks me “Why was there a Big Bang?,” I’ll be forced to reply, “Why is a cow?”

In the second article, Dr. Phillips answers the question: “Why do we do this?” by succinctly describing the purpose for which we Trinity Bioethics bloggers write the bioethics articles that we write. We believe there is purpose behind or beyond the human biology that we study determined by a loving God in whose image we are made. As such, our bioethical inquiries seek to understand whether the human purpose of a particular medical technology or procedure is complementary or contrary to God’s purpose. Why? As Dr. Phillips explained, because God loves us and has asked us to love our neighbor.

Maybe that is an answer to “Why was there a Big Bang?” (and “Why is a cow?”)

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