Fertility Fraud

By Neil Skjoldal

Last week, Canadian fertility specialist Dr. Norman Barwin lost his medical license after complaints that he had used his own sperm to artificially inseminate his patients without permission. Bionews.org reports that there were understandably strong reactions from the families affected by his horrific actions.  And now it has come to light that he had done this at least 11 other times.

This case brought to mind a case that came to prominence last year.  Dr. Donald Cline, an Indiana fertility specialist, used his sperm to artificially inseminate his patients and is said now to have more than 50 biological children.  Apparently, up until recently, there were no laws stating that it was illegal for a physician to do so. In light of the Cline scandal, Indiana passed a fertility fraud law which singles out fertility doctors who use their own sperm.  Theindychannel reports:  “The law, which takes effect July 1, makes it a level 6 felony if someone makes a misrepresentation involving a medical procedure, medical device or drug and human reproductive material.”  

It is truly sad that it takes a law to ensure that doctors will not artificially inseminate patients without their consent.  However, I am glad that Indiana did so.  (California has a more general law). If individuals are unable to regulate their behavior based on their own personal morality and ethics, it becomes incumbent upon society to investigate the matter to determine whether a law is needed or not.  This is what happened in this case.

Bonnie Steinbock takes an interesting perspective on the Cline case.  While acknowledging that the doctor was unethical, Steinbock questions whether or not the children born from this unethical behavior were actually harmed by him:  “What makes the lawsuits of the children Cline sired problematic is the fact that, but for Cline’s use of his own sperm, none of these children would have existed.”  She concludes, “If there are to be any medical malpractice suits against Cline, these should be limited to the parents, not the children.”

These unethical acts demand our attention. What can be done to stop them? And what of those who were victimized by this behavior? At the very least, they deserve answers. I hope that Indiana’s law might make a difference. Hopefully other states are taking notice.

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