Gender & Pain

By Neil Skjoldal

Last week, The Washington Post  published a summary of a recent article in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology entitled “Gender Bias in Pediatric Pain Assessment.”

The participants of the study were shown a video with a child described as a girl or boy enduring pain.  The authors  “then asked adults to rate how much pain the child experienced and displayed, how typical the child was in these respects, and how much they agreed with explicit gender stereotypes concerning pain response in boys versus girls.”  The study found that “the ‘boy’ was rated as experiencing more pain than the ‘girl’ despite identical clinical circumstances and identical pain behavior across conditions.”

Isaac Stanley-Becker, the author of The Post’s article, noted that the authors of this study were surprised that “the downgrading of female pain was driven by female participants, who were more likely than men to say that the pain of the subject was less severe when told she was a girl.”  Stanley-Becker further notes that these results are similar to an earlier study with female nursing and psychology students as participants, suggesting that there is “crossover to the health-care profession.”

It might be difficult for some to imagine anyone purposefully reacting to children’s pain in this way. However, in treating patients in a manner which honors their dignity as humans, it is good to be aware of any possible biases that may exist.  It appears that future research will continue to examine these matters.

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