Getting the Best Possible Organs for the Rest of Us

By Mark McQuain

A recent September 6th Perspective in the NEJM entitled “Voluntary Euthanasia – Implications for Organ Donation” teases with the following lead-in:“Canada now permits physicians to hasten the death of a patient by means of physician-assisted suicide or voluntary euthanasia. This development creates a new pathway for organ donation – and with it, some challenges.” Kudos to the NEJM marketing department for luring me into finally buying a full subscription. I’ll summarize some key points for those without a subscription.

The article begins by summarizing some differences between the comatose patient receiving end-of-life care in a standard ICU environment and the situation of individual intending voluntary euthanasia in a hospital. Healthcare teams may rely on surrogate decision making in the first instance but require first person consent in the euthanasia instance. Also, use of sedatives and analgesics in traditional end of life care are guided by the doctrine of double effect (intending comfort but not death) whereas physicians are not legally required to titrate those same medications in the instance of voluntary euthanasia (where euthanasia is legal). These issues are effectively the non-controversial portion of the article.

The heart of the article dealt with what one ought to do in the situation of a patient who wants to donate his or her organs “in the best condition possible” while receiving voluntary euthanasia. This would involve “procuring the patient’s organs in the same way that organs are procured from brain-dead patients (with the use of general anesthesia to ensure the patient’s comfort).”

The problem is that these patients aren’t brain dead yet. The authors are frustrated that awaiting brain death, even in voluntary euthanasia, results in sub-optimal quality of the donor organs. Harvesting organs from voluntarily euthanized patients before they are brain-dead “would require an amendment to the Criminal Code of Canada, which defines medical assistance in dying as the administration of a ‘substance’ by a qualified provider. By this definition, organ retrieval is not an accepted cause of death.” (N.B.- Though it most certainly is the cause of death!)

For those unable to retrieve the NEJM article, I offer a similar article by Dominic Wilkinson and Julian Savulescu supporting the same ethical argument (that it is OK to cause the death of an individual by harvesting their organs if they wished voluntary euthanasia). They summarize Dr. Robert Truog’s bioethical position (one of the authors of the present NEJM article) in footnote 66 as follows:

“Truog’s justification for ODE [Organ Donation Euthanasia] is different from that presented here [in our paper]. He argues that current concepts of brain death and the dead-donor rule are incoherent, and he proposes an alternative based upon the principles of autonomy and non-maleficence. We find Truog’s arguments compelling. Our paper can be seen as providing a complementary argument in favour of ODE. Truog favours a narrow definition for the group of patients who may consent to this procedure: only those who will die within minutes of withdrawal of life support, or who are permanently unconscious. Our definition of LSW [Life Support Withdrawal] donors overlaps with Truog’s, but includes the larger group of patients from whom it is permissible to withdraw life support in intensive care, and whose death is highly likely to ensue (though not necessarily instantly).”

To be blunt, what both groups are arguing is that it should be OK to surgically remove organs from an individual who is not brain dead though has already consented to voluntary euthanasia, knowing that the surgical removal of the organs will cause the immediate death of the individual. The priority of marrying euthanasia and organ donation is obtaining the best possible organs for the rest of us.

As a counter argument, I again turn to Wesley Smith for his thoughts in a recent National Review article similarly entitled “Canada Conjoining Euthanasia/Organ Donation”. It is short and to the point.

I must concur with Wesley Smith: The slippery slope of euthanasia is getting more slippery. How long before we grease those skids further by paying for the organs so harvested?

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