A pause for doctor-assisted suicide in California

Readers of this blog probably saw this week’s news that a California judge blocked the state’s End of Life Options Act, the one that legalized doctor-assisted suicide in California.  The law passed after apparent failure in a regular California Legislature session, when its sponsors brought it up again in a special session that was supposed to be about Medicaid funding.  The judge said that inserting the assisted suicide law into that session violated the California state constitution.  So doctor-aided suicide is on hold in the state, for the moment.

Sort of a technicality, and celebration of the decision by folks (like me) who are staunch opponents of assisted suicide is likely to be short-lived.  Supporters will certainly challenge the ruling on appeal, perhaps win, perhaps also bring up the law anew in the Legislature, with (re)passage all but certain.

Legal assisted suicide is still bad policy, and assisting another’s suicide is still unethical.  But efforts against it have to address the attitudes and perspectives of our fellow citizens.  Allowing doctors and others to aid suicide poisons the central calling of medicine to protect life and to address human suffering accordingly.  It risks undermining proper palliative care.  It creates a “duty to kill” that someone has to step up to fill—or to be conscripted to fill, against moral objections that will be rejected as “inconsistent with standards of medical practice.”  It cannot logically be limited to the terminally ill (see Steve Phillips’s May 9 post on this blog) and cannot be reliably limited to those who freely and willingly choose death.  And it opens the idea of “rights” to misuse by those who desire death and to misappropriation by those who have reason to think that someone else should desire death.

Opposing assisted suicide is a longer undertaking, more than one vote or even series of votes, more than a court case with appeals.  It requires the cultivation of moral virtue by ourselves and our posterity.  It requires humble compassion subject to valuing the sanctity of human life.  It requires changed hearts.

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