Uterine Transplantation – for Men?

Susan Haack began exploring the topic of uterine transplantation in women on this blog back in February 2014. In just under 4 short years, the technology has not only successfully resulted in live births in several women who received the uterine transplants, but outgoing president of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, Dr. Richard Paulson, is suggesting we consider exploring the technique in men. While there are certainly hurdles to overcome (need for cesarean section for the actual birth, hormone supplementation, complicated nature of the transplant even for cisgender women), Dr. Paulson does not consider these barriers insurmountable for transgender women.

Dr. Julian Savulescu, professor of practical ethics at Oxford, has cautioned that initiating a pregnancy in a transgender woman may be unethical if it poses significant risk to the fetus. The above-linked article misquotes his concern as a concern over “any psychological harm to the child born in this atypical way”. The following is his actual quote from his own blog:

Therefore, although technically possible to perform the procedure, you would need to be very confident the uterus would function normally during pregnancy. The first US transplant had to be removed because of infection. There are concerns about insufficient blood flow in pregnancy and pre-eclampsia. A lot of research would need to be done not just on the transplant procedure but on the effect in pregnancy in non-human animals before it was trialled in humans. Immunosuppressives would be necessary which are risky. A surrogate uterus would be preferable from the future child’s perspective to a transplanted uterus. Uterine transplantation represents a real risk to the fetus, and therefore the future child. We ought to (other things being equal) avoid exposing future children to unnecessary significant risks of harm.

One putative benefit might be the psychological benefit to the future mother of carrying her own pregnancy. This would have to be weighed against any harm to the child of being born in this atypical way.

His concerns are the baseline medical risks involved in using a transplanted uterus to conceive a child regardless of the sex of the recipient. None of his concerns relate to the psychological harm to the child potentially caused by a uterine transplantation in a transgender woman as opposed to a cisgender woman. Savulescu is explicit in the beginning of his blog that “[t]he ethical issues of performing a womb transplant for a [sic] transgender women are substantially the same as the issues facing ciswomen.” Is the only risk to the child “born this atypical way” just the additional need for hormone supplementation in the transgender woman compared to the cisgender woman? Can we really know, a priori, what all of the attendant risks to the child really are with uterine transplantation in a transgender woman?

Regardless, let’s assume Savulescu is correct, that there is indeed no ethical difference between carrying a child to term via uterine transplantation between a cisgender woman and a transgender woman. There certainly can be no ethical difference between carrying a child to term via uterine transplantation between a transgender woman and a cisgender man. If the foregoing is true, can there be any ethical barrier preventing a man via uterine transplantation to use his sperm to fertilize a donor egg and carry his baby to term? After all, per Savulescu, all we need be concerned about from a bioethical standpoint are the technical issues/risks of uterine transplantation regardless of the recipient’s biological sex or self-identified gender.

In Genesis, God created two complimentary sexes and stated this difference was good. We are moving toward eliminating differences between the sexes and arguing that this is good. Both of us cannot be correct.

I wonder if Dr Haack thought that we would get this far down this particular bioethical slippery slope in four short years?

Leave a Reply

Please Login to comment
  Subscribe  
Notify of