Bioethics @ TIU

Party politics, people’s lives

Posted January 6th, 2017 by Joe Gibes

As health care financing rises yet again to the top of our national legislative agenda, some fundamental questions ought to be strongly considered. First, and most fundamental: Is some level of healthcare a right, that the government is therefore obligated to protect? Is it better viewed as a common good, like roads and fire protection services, that everybody pays for through taxes and everybody benefits from? Should it be treated as a luxury item, like large-screen TVs and designer clothing, that only those who can afford it get to enjoy?

Other important questions: What are the strengths and weaknesses of the current system of financing health care? Who does it benefit? Who does it harm? What will be the effects on patients, intended and unintended, of changing the current system? Who will benefit, and who will be harmed by those changes? What will be the effects on physicians and health insurance companies? How will any changes affect the patient-physician relationship, for good or for ill?

Is the free market the best way to finance health care? Or is it best publicly financed? Or some mixture of both? Why?

A most important question is, How does the system treat the most disadvantaged, the poorest, the most helpless or down on their luck, and the ones who need it the most? How should it treat them?

What should the ideal health care system for patients look like? Can we start moving towards that ideal? How?

Other fundamental questions will no doubt present themselves to the reader. However, instead of questions like the ones above, it seems that the following questions are being debated instead: Which party and which president designed the system we have now? If it’s not my party, how can we get rid of the current system (and who cares if we have nothing to put in its place, let’s repeal it anyway)? How can we protect our party (whichever one it happens to be) from the political fallout that will occur as changes are made? What does the ideal health care system for my party look like?

I have many patients who have benefited from the most recent changes to the system. I have others who are starting to feel the downside of those changes. For patients, it is not primarily about parties or presidents, but about their health, their lives, and whether they are treated with dignity by the health care system. Health care financing will always be expensive, and therefore contentious. But our contentions should be based primarily on concern for patients. Recent legislative discord on the subject seems to stem not from concerns about what is best for patients, but what is best for political party power.

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