Another Ethical Slippery Slope for A.R.T.?

Medical business opportunities usually seem to make for interesting ethical discussions these days. Forbes recently published an article showcasing Prelude Fertility, an assisted reproduction technology (ART) start-up seeking to combine all the technologies of egg harvesting, cryopreservation and IVF under one umbrella for the purpose of controlling one’s biological clock. Aside from the business issues, the article does a fair job of discussing the medical risks and even some of the ethical concerns. I would like to focus on some of the ethical concerns.

The ethical concerns of standard embryo cryopreservation and IVF fall under two main areas. The first is that IVF often does not use all the embryos created by the process. The frozen embryos not used are human beings not commodities and should not be discarded (i.e. killed) or stored indefinitely (see Steve Phillip’s previous blog entry). The second issue is that although cryopreservation of embryos and IVF have now produced individuals who are beginning their third decade of life, we still do not know for certain what are the long-term health effects of this process (e.g. intelligence, aging, germline, etc.)

Prelude is focusing on an emerging technique of oocyte cryopreservation, which, if successful, will sidestep the first ethical concern – no embryos will be frozen, just the precursor eggs and sperm. Oocytes are very fragile and previous techniques used to cryopreserve them caused their destruction. The newer vitrification process of flash-freezing has significantly improved the preservation success for oocytes. The success rate has sufficiently improved such that the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) removed their experimental label from the vitrification procedure. Still ASRM warned: “Marketing this technology for the purpose of deferring childbearing may give women false hope and encourage women to delay childbearing.” They further warn:” There are not yet sufficient data to recommend oocyte cryopreservation for the sole purpose of circumventing reproductive aging”

This is exactly what Prelude is doing. One of the marketing points is that this process allows women to delay pregnancy to when it is more convenient for their career advancement. The long-term health concerns listed above for embryo cryopreservation are equally valid for oocyte cryopreservation – we simply do not yet know all the long-term human health consequences.

The CEO of Prelude, Martin Varsavsky, is putting his entrepreneurial money where is his mouth is, so to speak. He and his wife are expecting the first Prelude baby this January.

Marketing bravado aside, is career or lifestyle convenience really a good reason to go where ART has not ethically gone before?*

*apologies to Gene Roddenberry

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