Mitochondrial replacement boosterism

A new Viewpoint article (available for free, without a prescription) from the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) asserts that the United States is acting too slowly to advance mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs), the so-called “3-parent baby” approach that would seek to prevent mitochondrial DNA disease, which is transmitted maternally.  The authors approve of the recent recommendations by the afore-named Institute of Medicine (IOM), but are dismayed that, for now, recent federal legislation blocks FDA from further consideration of MRT applications.  This runs counter to the principle of beneficence, they argue, by foreclosing the possibility of reproductive relief for the estimated 800 US women affected each year.  This is their number, not mine, and presumably refers to 800 attempted births per year by women affected with these mitochondrial diseases, which are inherited and so present in an affected individual for life.  Again, the goal would be to allow these women to conceive and, one hopes, give birth to an unaffected offspring. 

In any event, the authors of the article in question find the IOM’s recommendations thoughtful, but the aforementioned legislation thoroughly unreasonable.  Besides blocking the advance of science in the U.S., we are ceding ground to the U.K., where it’s full speed ahead for clinical applications of MRTs.

Now, the IOM recommendations were anything but slapdash, reflecting careful thought leading to conclusions with which one may yet disagree.  What troubles me about the JAMA piece is how cavalier the authors are in embracing MRTs as the camel under the tent for doing anything and everything to the human genome.  They write (emphases are mine, not theirs):

“[The recent] developments [regarding MRTs] are nothing short of historic and their significance multifaceted. First, mitochondrial replacement therapy represents the sole example of state-approved germline gene therapy in the human. Second, it comprises the only known intervention with the potential to reduce the burden of mitochondrial DNA diseases. Third, it constitutes the first case in which organelle and, indeed, whole cytoplasmic cellular replacement are being contemplated. Fourth, it irrevocably alters assisted reproduction by placing it at the center of future genome editing efforts. Fifth, it acts as a test case for the regulatory adjudication of other emerging reproductive innovations. Examples include but are not limited to editing the genome of the human embryo and the prospect of using somatic (eg, skin) cells to generate eggs and sperm in a laboratory dish.”

I encourage readers to let this paragraph sink in.  The thinly-veiled argument is that putting breaks on these technologies is illegitimate not only because it violates the principle of beneficence, but more importantly because it could delay the day when humans are fully engineered.  The authors and their apologists will object that I am putting words into their mouths, but I think their enthusiasms are showing.

Read the whole thing.

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