Professionalism vs. commercialism in medicine (or, Yet another Black Friday special!!!)

Some thoughts on medicine and commercialism on this, the high holy day of the gods of commercialism:

The understanding of medicine as the satisfaction of consumer wants is corrosive to the practice of medicine as a profession.

“The practice of medicine is not a business and can never be one . . . Our fellow creatures cannot be dealt with as a man deals in corn and coal; the human heart by which we live must control our professional relations.” (Sir William Osler, 1903)

A profession involves the freedom if its practitioners from the simple market reduction of the work to that of the tradesman. It is fundamentally an ethical and moral endeavor. It entails independence of judgment, a degree of self-regulation, a covenantal commitment to patients, the bearing of a characteristic set of responsibilities, and adherence to a distinctive ethical code.

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From a hypothetical ad in today’s paper:

“Yes, you heard right, it’s our Black Friday special!! Have we in medical practice got a deal for you! Come over to St. Exorbitant’s where today, we’re offering one MRI for the price of two! (Actually, we’ll charge as high a rate as we can and take whatever your insurance company will allow!) Plus, we’ve got all the most-requested procedures of dubious benefit and unnecessary tests for your enjoyment!! (Unnecessary for your care, that is, but they might help finance that new atrium we’re building on to the hospital, which has really helped us attract patients away from our competition!)

“And if you don’t like our Hippocratic™ – brand selection, come on over to our other showroom, where you can peruse some of our less-traditional items! So, you’re not interested in our time-honored offerings of compassion, presence, and comfort? Well, we have a special discount today on Physican-Assisted Suicide (at such a bargain, too — at least, for our medical system which can finally stop paying for all those pharmaceuticals you’re taking!)! Looking for the perfect child? Sorry, we don’t have that yet, but we can test the one you’re carrying to see if she meets your specifications and tolerances! Now how much would you pay? But wait, there’s more! Our technicians can abort, ah, that is, terminate the child you’re carrying if we find something wrong, or for any other reason, or for no reason at all! We’re eager to serve — YOU! Here, the patient is King and Queen! We will do anything — anything — within our power (and your ability to pay) that you want, and if it isn’t within our power yet, don’t worry, we’re experimenting on your embryos to find ways to serve you better!  (We accept many insurances, cash, and all major credit cards!)”

 

Oh, wait — you say you can’t pay? No insurance? Well, well, funny how those market forces work, isn’t it? I’m sorry, we won’t be able to help you today. Why don’t you try the internet? I hear there’s very good care to be had there!

 

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Jon Holmlund
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Jon Holmlund

Part of an “alternate” ad, perhaps–“Got insurance? Good. Need to find a doctor? Sorry they are getting scarcer. You could see a “physician extender” instead; they do well in lots of cases. But in any event, they all work for us–a big system paid by the government–now, and we will tell you what your choices are. An appointment today will not be possible–tomorrow is not looking too good either. What matters in your choices is less what your values dictate than what we can afford, and even if it is standard care, we might need to limit you to yesterday’s… Read more »