The Physician and Chaplain Are Kin

One of our good family friends has been in the hospital the last several weeks, and I’ve gotten to spend a lot of time with her. She is in her eighties and regards me as her “grandson by choice,” and I remember fondly visiting my grandparents in my high school years and listening to her vivid stories and witty humor. She has a firecracker personality and that shines through even though she has a number of medical problems.

One day this week, I went to see her at breakfast-time, and I offered to continue to help feed her eggs and coffee. She declined, saying that she was sleepy. I knew the food would be good for her but felt at that instance I should put down the plate and just sit quietly with her as she drifted off to sleep. The conditioned impulse in me wanted me to jump and run off to “get some work done.” But I knew that what I was doing was a key part of the healing process, an important part of medicine. My presence in the room had an impact on her allowing her to sleep peacefully. And her presence with me allowed me to reflect on things that I’m often too busy to think about it.

Unfortunately, physicians often neglect these very human interactions in their rush to analyze the latest data and strategize about the next procedure. But as leaders of the health care team, I believe it is required for them to be aware of the spiritual health of their patients. Over the course of the morning a half dozen nurses, occupational therapists, and respiratory therapists scurried in and out of the room. All of them were polite and technically adept, but none of them really understood the real situation of an elderly woman over 30 miles away from her home sick in the hospital. Of course, it is the physician who sets the tone for awareness of the patient’s human situation. I was beginning to think that the best thing for this sweet lady was for her to return to the smaller, rural hospital for the sake of her spirit.

Many people write with regret on how the medical profession has become a technical endeavor almost void of spiritual insight. The colleagues of Hippocrates didn’t just draw up some guidelines for medical practice but instead swore an oath before the gods because they knew the gravity of their profession. Likewise, the Christian disposition of medicine in America has historically coupled church charity and chaplaincy with medicine because it takes into account the spiritual well-being of the sick and the injured. I pray the physician and chaplain shake hands and once again embark on this healing endeavor together.

Addendum: Today, I asked for a Gideon Bible to read to my friend. There wasn’t a Bible to be found on the entire floor, even at the other nurse’s station. The nurse said, “This isn’t a hotel.” I replied, “I think you need it more here than at a hotel.” To her credit, she agreed.

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