Can the Church have a distinctive take on health care insurance reform?

The Supreme Court has finished hearing the case for and against various provisions of the Obama health care plan. All that remains now is to wait for the decision, which will be handed down sometime in June.

There is much to be opposed to in any scheme of health care insurance reform. If we are waiting for a perfect plan before we will declare our support, then we will never support any reform plan. However, I believe the problem of how to justly provide health care to all is an opportunity for the Church to counter the perception of alignment with partisan political agendas and show instead its alignment with an agenda that transcends political or personal preferences.

The doctrine of God’s love, of the self-giving agape which God demonstrates toward us and enables us to show to others, should surely influence our attitude towards health care reform. One expression in Scripture of what our attitude should be is found in Philippians, where Paul writes, “Each of you should look not only to your own interests, but also to the interests of others. Your attitude should be the same as that of Christ Jesus . . .” (Philippians 2:4-5) Much of our resistance to reform comes from considering only our own interests, to the neglect of the interests of others: placing our own desire for limitless choice over the interests of those who have virtually no choices; putting our desire to keep more of our income out of the hands of the tax collector over the interests of those with much more meager incomes who would benefit from the care increased taxes might provide; placing our general principled distrust of government higher in importance than the real good limited government intervention might be able to accomplish in this particular situation. As Christians, we can be concerned not first of all with our own rights and interests, but with those of others, and can willingly insist not on a right to maximum health care but only to a level that is socially equitable and affordable.

As Christians, we have a unique opportunity at this time in history to be a singular witness to Christ by approaching health care and its reform from a theological standpoint rather than the standpoint of a political party agenda or our own rights and interests. By overcoming the tendencies that naturally make us resistant to health care reform, we will show that we are conformed to something other than our culture or our own private interests. By making clear that the followers of Christ are advocates for those unable to afford care, even when it may be disadvantageous to ourselves, we will take our place among the ranks of our Christian forebears who, as they started the first hospitals and hospices in Europe, were at the forefront of health care reform in their day.

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Margaret
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Obama said that if the United States failed to repay their debts, it would have a “profound impact and confusing” on the global economy as a whole and on the health care bill. It’s surprising here is that health support up to 16% of the U.S. GNP

sara
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i agree with this article and i think its tru

jev
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i dont think so

Vinzalice
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Good article, hope there is some good change since 2014!