Eight is Enough

 

In response to a family’s having eight babies by IVF and gestational surrogacy:

“In this society, if you have money, you can have miracles!”

“Having children is now a luxurious game for the rich!”

“This completely topples the traditional meaning of parents.”

“From the sound of it, they just tried to have some kind of baby machine.”

“Gestational surrogacy is the business of renting out organs.”

“Why did they have to hire so many people to have babies for them? Did they think they had the right to bear children just because they were rich? Secondly, what respect to life did they show? Multiple pregnancies are super risky.”

These are reactions from the public, press, and government officials to a wealthy couple having two sets of triplets and one set of twins via IVF and two surrogates in China, where there has been an official one-child-per-family policy since 1978. Last month a southern Chinese newspaper broke the story of this family, and you can sense the angry reaction of their society in the quotes above.

(There is apparently a large surrogacy industry in China, despite a 2001 ban on Chinese hospitals doing the procedures. The manager of one surrogacy agency reports being overwhelmed with applications from aspiring surrogate mothers, most of whom are having emergencies and “need a large sum of money.”)

In the uproar, we can see erupting some of the tensions surrounding these technologies that are still somewhat under the surface in our own society: What about the divide between those who can and can’t afford reproductive technology? What does it mean to be a parent, especially where surrogacy is involved? Is surrogacy the commodification of women, the reduction of woman to womb?

There is a lot of worrying that China will catch up and surpass western economy and culture. It seems that in some areas they have already caught up with us: pushing the envelope of societal norms with the use of reproductive technologies, and the commodification of women in the process. In another area they are still far behind us: they have not yet lost the ability to be uncomfortable, shocked, even a little disgusted at the ethical implications of these technologies for families and society.

 

(Sources: Here and Here)

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