A Lament For the Loss of Community

This guest post is authored by LL French, a current student at TIU.

Community is dead. Cause of death: uncertain. But definitely dead, gone, passed, slipped on a banana peel, deceased, dead!

For Millennials like me, we’ve never lived in a world where neighbors help each other. After all, isn’t that the job of the government? Welfare? Food stamps? Medicaid? (Please note the heavy tone of sarcasm in my voice right now.)

Let me explain the reason behind my cynical rant on community. Today my little bioethics-obsessed mind ran across a CNN news article. In the story, Baby Pierce, a four-month-old with rare Heterotaxy Syndrome, needed heart surgery. Demanding the best care for her infant son, Pierce’s mother insisted on sending her baby to a top Boston hospital for his care.

Problem: Medicaid wouldn’t pay to send him to Boston when another “capable” hospital existed in Indiana.

Solution: fundraising on Facebook and donations from mothers of children with heart problems!

Now for the quote that convinced me that community was dead – in the words of Pierce’s mother: “I think it is sad that a bunch of moms and strangers who don’t even know me or my child have stepped up to the plate more than… the government, and insurance, and Medicaid.” This statement troubles me. She thinks “it is sad” for strangers to help? Isn’t that the very essence of community? Isn’t community, by definition, any group of people that come together to encourage, support, and protect you?

Should Medicaid have helped the young mother? I’ll leave that question to more capable minds. What I am shocked by is the assumption that strangers shouldn’t help! I fear we now live in a world where we rely on the government too much. We rely on the government to be the Good Samaritan that we once were. I mourn the loss of a traditional community where generosity to those in need was normative. Indeed, I fear bioethics and health care in general has much to lose if community dies.

Yes, I exaggerate. There is hope. Community is not dead, but perhaps transformed? Yes, we don’t live in a world where neighbors help each other. Instead, we live in a world where random people on Facebook can form a community to save a baby! Our traditional sense of community has been replaced by Facebook, Twitter, and texting, etc. As a natural cynic, I doubt Facebook’s power to bring people together in community, but Baby Pierce gives me hope that people can come together to form a new kind of community – but only if we are intentional in our pursuit of community and we lose this silly notion that strangers shouldn’t help each other.

See more on Baby Pierce

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