Knowing too little about too much

 

With the ability to map the human genome, we find ourselves in the bewildering position of knowing too much and knowing too little at the same time.

Consider this scenario: The year is 2015. You, being the modern that you are, want to know your future, so that you can have some degree of control over it. You’re pretty sure astrology isn’t very helpful; but you’ve been keeping up with Time and Newsweek, and you’re thinking from what you’ve read there that genetic testing offers the scientific equivalent of what astrology promises. So you go down to the local Genetics-R-Us and for a mere $99 have your entire genome analyzed in 15 minutes. You then sit down with one of their genetic consultants, who reveals that you have a 64% likelihood of developing diabetes and a 43% chance of developing colon cancer. You go on a vegan diet, exercise three hours a day, and start a regular regimen of bowel cleansing and weekly colonoscopies. You have your genome analysis results sent to your primary care provider (PCP) to be part of your medical record.

Fast forward to 2025, when you are diagnosed with a rare cancer of the nose. After a little research, you discover that this particular type of cancer can be predicted by genetic testing. Genetics-R-Us went out of business, so you go to your PCP and demand to know why she didn’t warn you about the possibility of this cancer. She steps out to do a little research and comes back into the room:

“It turns out that the gene that predisposes you to this kind of cancer wasn’t discovered until 2019, and you had this test done in 2015.”

“But when that information became available, why didn’t you go back and recheck my genome?” you reply.

“That’s the responsibility of the company that tested you,” she says, as she gets her defense lawyer on the phone.

“But Genetics-R-Us went bankrupt! You’re the only one who has the data!”

“We have thousands of these genome maps in our records, each consisting of six billion base-pairs. They are encoded in various formats, none of which are compatible with each other, and some of which are so outdated we can’t access them anymore. Plus, a 200-page update of the latest new gene dicoveries is published every month. We simply don’t have the resources to go back through everybody’s individual genome and check for all of these genetic abnormalities that are constantly being discovered.”

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With the capability to map an individual’s genome, we can gather lots of data, but we do not yet have the knowledge of how to apply that data (much less the wisdom with which to use it!). We know too little about all that we know. As genome testing becomes more affordable and widely available, some of the ethical questions that arise are, Is there an ethical obligation to go back an re-analyze data in light of new findings? If so, whose is the responsibility?

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