Down Syndrome and Thanksgiving

 

Despite today being the retail abomination known as “Black Friday,” I will continue in the vein of Thanksgiving and write about a person I am thankful for.

My nephew’s name is Jacob, and he has Down Syndrome. He just turned 18. He is one of the most loyal and loving people I have the privilege of knowing. He gives incredible, bone-crushing hugs. His cell phone voice mail message ends with, “Love you.” His aunt, my sister, lies in a nursing home, barely able to interact since a brain injury in June; but Jacob doesn’t care about her medical conditions, he just loves to be there with her, because he loves his aunt. I am thankful for Jacob’s example of unconditional love.

When we take Jacob out to eat, he orders french fries. And when he eats french fries, he eats them a certain way, one at a time, dipped just so in his favorite condiment: steak sauce. Lunch takes at least an hour. I am thankful that Jacob makes us slow down. 

Jacob loves music. He owns several guitars, and received a bass guitar for his last birthday. He especially loves worship music. He can strum his guitars, although a guitarist probably wouldn’t call it “playing” guitar. His singing isn’t exactly on key. Yet most Sundays he is in front of his church leading worship with the worship team. His microphone may not be turned up terribly high, but his love for Christ is at full volume. I am thankful for Jacob’s example of unselfconscious worship.

Jacob sometimes requires extra patience. His parents have made extra sacrifices. There are things he does that will drive you crazy if you let them (Is there anybody for whom that is not true?). He will never live independently, and will always require a level of extra care. But the extra care and patience are richly rewarded. And while we think we are making extra sacrifices for Jacob, I sometimes think that God sees it differently: that He is giving us an extra measure of blessing by allowing us to be with Jacob. Yet it seems that too many, when they think of “Down Syndrome,” think only of the extra work and sacrifice and limitations. Either that, or they think of a life that is not worth living. Whatever the thinking, it is both sad and frightening that in this country, about 92% of the unborn babies suspected (on the basis of prenatal testing) of having Down Syndrome are aborted: sad, because of the loss of human life through abortion as well as the loss of the privilege of being with these unique people; and frightening, because of what it says about us as a society. I am thankful that Jacob was not one of the 92%.

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