A busy week for stem cells

Two bits of news from the world of stem cells this week:

First, Geron, the California company conducting the first ever official study using embryonic stem cells in humans, has suddenly terminated the study. Geron cited economic factors as the reason for stopping the trial. The study involved spine injury patients; Geron said only that the therapy was well tolerated, with no serious adverse events.

Second, a study using “adult” stem cells from patients’ own hearts to repair their own damaged heart tissue has produced promising results. The study’s purpose was not to show that the use of the cardiac stem cells was effective, but to make sure that the process is safe (the Geron study was also a test of safety); but study subjects receiving their own stem cells have already shown improvement in heart function.

Daniel Heumann, of the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, said of the halted Geron study, “I’m disgusted. It makes me sick. To get people’s hopes up and then do this for financial reasons is despicable. They’re treating us like lab rats.”

The authors of the adult stem cell study, while warning that the results of the trial needed confirmation in larger trials, called the initial improvement in cardiac function “very encouraging.”

Geron has invested tens of millions of dollars in embryonic stem cell therapy in the past decade.

Even if one does not believe that it is unethical to destroy our offspring to find cures for our diseases, one should at least acknowledge that spending tens of millions of finite research dollars for an agenda that repeatedly uses reckless hype to gets people’s hopes up, only to dash them, is an unethical option when compared with funding “encouraging” research with a proven track record of producing successful treatments.

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