The Help and what it means to be human

I am currently reading The Help by Kathryn Stockett. I saw the movie first and as I read the book it really is true the book is better, even though the movie is very well done. For those who haven’t done either one, the story is about a young white woman in Jackson, Mississippi who decides to write a book that tells the stories of African American maids working for white families in Jackson in the early 1960s. But the book, like her book, is mostly about those women and the truth of what their lives were like.

As I experience their lives in the midst of the novel I have been thinking about the ethical issues that were going on during the turbulent times of the civil rights movement in the sixties. The major issues revolve around what it means to be human and how one human being should treat another. That resonates with what is at the heart of many of the issues we face in bioethics today.

Aibilene is the first of the maids to agree to tell her story. Interestingly she is a woman with a strong Christian faith who writes out her prayers to God and sees him answer as she expresses her concern mostly for others and occasionally for herself. She models virtues of love and compassion while hurting from the injustice of life in a world where she is not seen as a person of full moral value. She is not perfect, but her virtues and endurance under hardship demonstrate a humanity that touches me. It is amazing that as a society we could have told her she was not fully human.

How many are being told today that they are not fully human by the things our society chooses to do?

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