Death and Dying in the Land of Paradise

My father just turned 85.  He resides with my mother, who is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, in an assisted care facility.  As I witness my father’s health gradually deteriorate, I wonder what it must be like to know that death is likely close-at-hand.  He is currently unable to accomplish tasks that I take for granted, such as bending over to pull up his pants, or making it to the bathroom in time.  Yet, even in his current state, it could be much worse.

A recent (October 17) ABC news report presents the story of Jeri Orfali, a promising software executive who, at 56, developed ovarian cancer.  Jeri and her husband of 30 years were living in Hawaii at the time of her death.  The report describes her final days of bearing “excruciating pain that was not helped by palliative care.”  According to her husband, “In the end I could see tumors coming out of her legs and in her neck,” he said. “Her legs were swollen and her stomach was so bloated, the cancer almost burst out of her. She couldn’t get her next breath.”[1]

As a result of the experience, Robert Orfali (the husband) would like Hawaii to legalize physician-assisted suicide.  In fact, apparently it was “legal” in Hawaii as far back as 1909 based on the following stipulation for PAS:

[W]hen a duly licensed physician or osteopathic physician pronounces a person affected with any disease hopeless and beyond recovery and gives a written certificate to that effect to the person affected or the person’s attendant, nothing herein shall forbid any person from giving or furnishing any remedial agent or measure when so requested by or on behalf of the affected person.”

As a result, advocates for PAS believe that it is now time to establish a legalized ‘death with dignity.’  Of course, the movement to support PAS has its critics.  The Catholic Church and other right-to-life groups fear the potential consequences of PAS and call for Hawaiians to resist PAS’s legalization.  Indeed, previous attempts to legalize PAS in Hawaii were overturned (by a narrow margin) through opposition groups.  Thus, there is a significant divide that pits those who fear the negative results of PAS against those who view end-of-life care as insufficient.

Frankly, I struggle with this.  As a Christian, I have strong convictions against taking matters into our own hands; PAS, I believe, is wrong from a biblical/theological standpoint.  Yet we live in a secular society, one that does not necessarily share my beliefs.  I would oppose the legalization of PAS in America, but I base my opposition on the view that God is sovereign over life and death.  Honestly, I can understand why a person without theistic principles would think that PAS should be permitted.

In next week’s blog, I will present some of my theological conclusions about death and dying.  In the meantime, what do you think are some of the strongest arguments against PAS outside of Scripture?


[1] Susan Donaldson James, October 17, 2011.  http://abcnews.go.com/Health/retired-hawaiian-doctors-test-102-year-physicians-assisted/story?id=14739855&singlePage=true

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Steve Phillips
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I think one of the strongest arguments against PAS is the one that says that a physician who agrees to participate in PAS must decide that that patient’s request for suicide is rational one as a condition of participation. To make that decision the physician must independently decide that the patient’s life is not worth living, but making a decision that another person’s life is not worth living is not something that anyone should do. Saying that another person’s life is not worth living negates the inherent value of human lives that is the basis for our concepts of human… Read more »