Ethical Blind Spots

Recently I have been impressed with how much there is for those of us who are involved in bioethics to learn from those who study other areas of ethics. Business ethics in particular has a lot to offer. A recent article in The Age discusses a book titled Blind Spots written by Max Bazerman, a professor of business administration at Harvard Business School, and Ann Tenbrunsel, a professor of business ethics at the University of Notre Dame, that discusses the concept of unintentional ethical misbehavior.  They talk about how we can behave unethically without being aware of it by excluding important and relevant information from our decisions.
One of the examples in the article is medical.  It involves a person with cancer who goes to a surgeon who recommends surgery and then to a radiation oncologist who recommends radiation therapy.  It could appear that each specialist is being intentionally self-serving, but they suggest that it is possible for both specialists to genuinely believe that their treatment is superior.  They can fail to realize that their opinions are biased by their training, incentives, and preferences.
It made me think about how I may do the same thing.  As a family physician I have a bias toward treating things I can diagnose as medical diseases with medicines.  I try to incorporate other things such as counseling and physical treatments such as exercises and physical therapy, but since those are not the things I was trained to do, I may not use them as much or as well as I could.  It is easier and more comfortable to prescribe a medicine.  To make ethically sound recommendations about what is in a patient’s best interest we need to be aware of our own biases and be sure to encourage input from others who can see the patient’s needs from a different point of view.

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