The marketing of umbilical cord blood banking

 

One stem-cell success story has been the use of stem cells derived from umbilical cord blood. The list  (more here) of diseases treatable by transplants of such stem cells is impressive, even more so when compared to, say, embryonic stem cell treatments, which are currently used in therapies such as . . . well . . . hmmm . . . uh, let me get back to you on that one.

One gratifying aspect of the use of umbilical cord stem cells is that obtaining them carries none of the unethical aspects associated with embryonic stem cell use. Nobody is killed in collecting umbilical cord blood; after the delivery of a baby, blood is removed from a vein in the umbilical cord, causing no harm to mother or newborn.

This does not mean that there are no ethical issues surrounding umbilical cord blood. There are currently two ways to “bank” umbilical cord blood, either through public or commercial cord blood banks. The public banking option is free to the parents, strictly quality controlled, and the blood is available to any patient who needs it and is a correct match. Commercial banks, on the other hand, typically charge $500-$2000 to collect the blood, along with an annual storage fee of $110-$150; are not as quality-controlled; and the blood is available only for the exclusive (potential) use of the patient.

Ethical issues arise from the marketing tactics employed by some of the commercial banks. The premise underlying the marketing is, Bank your child’s cord blood for his or her own exclusive use, so that if your child gets a disease sometime in his or her life, we’ll have perfectly matched stem cells to treat their disease, and you’ll have peace of mind! It is not unusual for companies to advertise cord blood as “Life insurance,” or to warn that “This may be your one opportunity to save your child,” or to promise “Potential regenerative therapies from stem cells such as treatments for arthritis, heart disease, etc.”  — therapies which currently do not exist. (The quotes are from commercial websites.)

These ads are based on hype and fear: hype, because they seem to promise treatments that are not currently available and may never come to pass; fear, because they play on every parent’s concern about terrible diseases their child could contract.

(Hype and fear: aren’t those are the same tactics used to promote embryonic stem cell research?)

Embryonic stem cell research and umbilical cord stem cell therapies are ethical worlds apart in their practice, and we should aggressively oppose the former and actively pursue the latter. But we should also oppose unethical commercial exploitation of otherwise ethical therapies through false advertising. Commercial umbilical blood banks should be held to strict “Truth-in-advertising” standards, and stopped from falsely promising anything more than we know they can deliver. This might save a lot of parents their hard-earned cash.

And while we’re at it, we ought to hold the promoters of embryonic stem-cell research to the same standards of truth. This might save a lot of embryonic persons their lives.

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Bob Cranston
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Bob Cranston

Good Job, well said, Joe. Hype and fear. The worst lie is often the one that contains an element of truth–Stem cells have done wonderful things–just not embryonic stem cells–contrary to popular misconception. Bob