On Licensing Abortion Clinics

 

Should abortion clinics be required to meet minimum standards for patient access, medical record-keeping, sanitation, etc., as are medical facilities in which invasive procedures are performed?  More than twenty states have decided that question in the affirmative, including Virginia, whose State Board of Health is set to vote this Thursday on licensing regulations that would affect clinics in which 5 or more first-trimester abortions are performed per month.

In noting the support of staunch pro-life advocates for the proposed regulations, the editors of The Washington Post have raised their pens in moral indignation, writing that “IF SOMETHING about anti-abortion advocates pressing for “safer” abortion clinics rings false to you, trust your instincts.”[1] The editors were specifically targeting the Family Foundation and  the Virginia Catholic Conference, arguing, in effect, that consistency demands that abortion opponents disavow any serious concern for the health of women who choose to abort their children. One cannot, the editors would have their readers believe, advocate both for the criminalization of elective abortion and for the health of women who opt for abortion.

Sadly, The Post demonstrates in this “editorial board opinion” the willingness of supposedly “upper-tier”journalists to chuck the most basic rules of critical thinking when defending some cherished social ideal or policy. Surely they know they have committed the classic error of posing a false dilemma, which assumes only two options exist when, in fact, others are possible. It is not only possible for opponents of abortion to care about the health of the abortion clinic’s clientele, but such is a present reality as pro-life pregnancy crisis centers across our country routinely demonstrate in their ministrations to the health and well-being of post-abortive women. A commitment to the sanctity of human life, most pro-lifers would argue, requires not only concern for the baby’s life, but for the mother’s as well. So, while there should be no expectation that pro-lifers would cease from their efforts to outlaw elective abortion, one ought not to be surprised to see them advocating for the health and safety of aborting mothers.

Truly, as it concerns the issue of consistency, advocates of abortion who would stand in the way of regulating abortion clinics as medical facilities are in a tough spot. They generally desire that elective abortion would be viewed as healthcare (see my post from June 27, 2011), but when it comes to treating it as such, they object. The Post’s editors are willing, they claim, to accept some regulations, but not those requiring a significant outlay of capital. To that, I suspect, many hospital administrators will simply respond “Welcome to our our world!” Meeting medical facility regulatory requirements is, no doubt, a burden, but it is one that must be borne out of concern for patient safety and well-being.


[1] http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/targeting-bortions/2011/09/01/gIQAS7Fa2J_story.html

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