To Tell the Truth

One of the foundations of medical ethics is the importance of truth-telling by physicians.  The relationship between a patient and physician depends on the patient being able to trust the physician which depends on truth-telling.  When I discuss this with students their expectations are for physicians to be fully and completely honest with their patients.

But what about patients being truthful with their doctors?  Recently Time online referred to an article in The Arizona Republic about patients lying to their doctors.  It talks about the ways that patients tend to be less than fully honest when they talk to their doctors, and how that can interfere with getting proper care.

It seems obvious that physicians should be truthful with their patients and patients should be truthful with their physicians, but we don’t always do that because it is hard.   It is hard to tell a patient something the he or she does not want to hear.  It is hard to tell your physician that you are not really exercising three times a week (or your dentist that you don’t floss every day).  We want to please other people and have them approve of us, and we don’t want to make them feel bad.

Sometimes, though, we need to do what is hard to do what is right.  1 Cor 13:6 reminds us that love “rejoices with the truth.”

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